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Male, UK/US, born 1861-12-12, died 1935-12-09

Associated with the firms network

Allied Architects Association of Los Angeles (AAALA); Burton and Parkinson, Architects; Fisher, Elmer, H., Architect; Marshall and Wilson, Architects; Parkinson and Bergstrom, Architects; Parkinson and Evers, Architects; Parkinson and Parkinson, Architects; Parkinson, John, Architect


Professional History

Résumé

Architectural apprentice, Jonas J. Bradshaw, Architect, Bolton, Lancashire, England, c. 1874-1880.

Joiner, Bolton, England, 1881.

Principal, John Parkinson, Architect, Napa, CA, 1885-1889;

Partner, Parkinson and Evers, Architects, Seattle, WA, 03/1889-06/1890; according to Woodbridge and Montgomery, Parkinson worked in the busy architectural office of Elmer Fisher, when he first came to Seattle. (See Sally Woodbridge and Roger Montgomery, "Yesler Building," Guide to Architecture in Washington State, [Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1980], p. 113.)

Principal, John Parkinson, Architect, Seattle, WA, 1890-1894, and Los Angeles, CA, 1896-1905 and 1915-1920; between 1891-1894 he worked for the Seattle School Board, designing schools; he left Seattle during the 1893 Depression in c. 1894 for Los Angeles, where he remained, building a very successful practice. In 1901-1902, Parkinson had his office in Room #702 of the Laughlin Building in Downtown Los Angeles. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, 1901, p. 673 and Los Angeles, California, City Directory, 1902, p. 1528.)

The book, Our Architecture Morgan & Walls John Parkinson Hunt & Eager, Los Angeles, California, 1904, stated the following about his time in Seattle: "In January 1889, Mr. Parkinson went to Seattle and remained there until 1894, during which time he constructed three million dollars worth of buildings, among which were the Butler Building, the Pacific Building occupied by the Seattle National Bank, the Seattle Athletic Club Building, and the Epler Building. Mr. Parkinson was the city architect of schools of Seattle and during his incumbency constructed about thirty of the school buildings." (See J.L. LeBerthon, Our Architecture Morgan & Walls John Parkinson Hunt & Eager, Los Angeles, California, 1904, [Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1904], n.p.)

Partner, Burton and Parkinson, Architects, Los Angeles, CA, 1894-1895. In 1895, Burton and Parkinson operated in Rooms #94-95 of the Stowell Block, at 226 South Spring Street. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, 1895, p. 1506.)

Principal, John Parkinson, Architect, Los Angeles, CA, 1896-1904, c. 1916-1920. Parkinson maintained an office in Room #213 of the Currier Building in 1896-1897. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation California State Library, California History Section; Great Registers, 1866-1898; Collection Number: 4 - 2A; CSL Roll Number: 21; FHL Roll Number: 976930, accessed 07/12/2018.) He moved to Room #606 in the Laughlin Building by 1899 and to Room #702 by 1901. Parkinson remained here through 1904. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, Classfied Business Directory, 1899, p. 1000 and Los Angeles, California, City Directory, Classfied Business Directory, 1901,p. 1226.)

Partner, Parkinson and [George Edwin] Bergstrom, Architects, Los Angeles, CA, c. 1906-1914. In 1905, John Parkinson was listed as practicing on his own in Room #1215 of the Braly Building, Los Angeles. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, Classfied Business Directory, 1905,p. 2001.) The Parkinson and Bergstrom Office was located at 508 South Spring Street, Room #1335 in 1907. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, Classfied Business Directory, 1907,p. 1652.)

After the dissolution of Parkinson and Bergstrom and before he partnered with his son, Donald, John Parkinson operated on his own, moving offices frequently. In 1915, he had his headquarters in Rooms #1035-1037 of the Security Building. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, 1916, p. 2290.) By 1916, he leased space at 510 South Spring, Room #1037. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, 1916, p. 2146.) In 1918, Parkinson had two offices, one at 458 South Spring Street, Room #420, and 746 South Central Avenue, Room #248. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, 1918, p. 2246.)

Partner, Parkinson and Parkinson, Architects, Los Angeles, CA, 1920-1935.

Professional Service

Architect, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA; Member, State of California, Board of Architecture, 1919-1933; Member, American Institute of Architects (AIA); Founding Member, City of Los Angeles, Municipal Art Commission, 1903-1910.

Parkinson held six U.S. Patents for various electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic machines.

Archives

Most of Parkinson and Parkinson's drawings are held by Parkinson Architectural Archives LLC, Parkinson Field Architects, P.O. Box 2506, Galveston, TX 77553-2506;

Education

Education

Parkinson attended the Saint Luke's School, Bolton, England, UK; his secondary school education ended at age 13; like many architects of the 19th century, he learned by apprenticing himself to an established practitioner in Bolton, England, Jonas J. Bradshaw, until c. 1880; Parkinson took night school classes in architectural drawing and engineering at the Mechanics' Institute, Bolton, UK, earning a Diploma in Engineering and Architecture in 1882.

Personal

Relocation

Parkinson was born in the northwestern English town of Scorton in Lancashire in 1861. Scorton was located on the eastern bank of the River Wyre, that had a station on the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway, but had developed limited industries. The most significant during John Parkinson's childhod was a mill owned by Peter Ormrod (1796–1875) that spun cotton yarn used in the large textile mills of Bolton, England. Ormrod built a large manor house, Wyresdale Hall, in 1856, designed by the notable Lancashire architect Edward Graham Paley (1823-1895), a building John may have known. According to the 1861 British Census, Thomas Parkinson and his family lived in the township of Nether Wyresdale, in the village of Scorton. Neighbors of the Parkinsons worked in agriculture or labored in the Ormrod cotton mill. The Parkinson household consisted of Thomas, his wife, Mary Ann, daughter Margaret Sarah (then 1 year old), his mother Margaret Parkinson (born c. 1788 in Lancaster, Lancashire, England), and his brother, Richard, (born c. 1817 in Lancaster, England). Richard worked as a night watchman at the town's cotton mill. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Class: RG 9; Piece: 3153; Folio: 143; Page: 6; GSU roll: 543088, accessed 07/12/2018.) John had not been born yet when the 1861 census had been taken.

In 1871, the Parkinson Family lived at 477 Jane Lane in Worsley, England. Most of the Parkinson's Worsley neighbors either worked in cotton mills or mined coal. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Class: RG10; Piece: 3966; Folio: 155; Page: 4; GSU roll: 841956, accessed 07/11/2018.)

The British Census of 1881 showed the Parkinsons living in Halliwell, Bolton, England. John worked as a joiner at this time, while his father continued to drive the engine at a local cotton mill. His sister, Margaret, worked as a draper's assistant. Richard, John's 65-year-old uncle, stoked the furnace at the local cotton mill at age 65. The family lived at 50 Bashall Street in Halliwell. A next-door neighbor at 52 Bashall, Joseph Salton, (last name perhaps misspelled, born c. 1846 in England), also worked as a joiner, and may have assisted John in finding work in this trade. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Class: RG11; Piece: 3823; Folio: 66; Page: 47; GSU roll: 1341914, accessed 07/12/2018.)

In about 1883, Parkinson emigrated from England to Winnipeg, MT, (where he found work building fences), and then to Minneapolis, MN. The US Census of 1900 recorded that he entered the country in 1884, while the 1920 US Census put the date as 1882. (See Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Los Angeles Ward 3, Los Angeles, California; Roll: 89; Page: 13B; Enumeration District: 0033; FHL microfilm: 1240089, accessed 07/12/2018 and Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1920; Census Place: Los Angeles Assembly District 63, Los Angeles, California; Roll: T625_106; Page: 15B; Enumeration District: 150, accessed 07/12/2018.) A source has indicated about this period of his life: "After spending two years in Minneapolis he moved to the Coast, arriving in California in 1885 and locating in the charming city of Napa. During his stay in Napa he designed a business building for the Napa Bank." (See J.L. LeBerthon, Our Architecture Morgan & Walls John Parkinson Hunt & Eager, Los Angeles, California, 1904, [Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1904], n.p.)

Some sources have indicated that Parikinson returned to England from Minneapolis. The Wikipedia article on him stated: "He returned to England only to discover that the English construction trades demanded more time and service for advancement. He decided that his then capabilities would be more appropriate to the less-structured opportunities in America." (See Wikipedia.com, "John Parkinson," accessed 07/12/2018.)

From England, he relocated to Napa, CA, where he worked as a stairbuilder by 1885; here, he designed the Bank of Napa (1888), his first commission. (See Shaping Seattle Architecture, A Historical Guide to the Architecture, Jeffrey Karl Ochsner, ed., [Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1994], p. 28.)

Just before the Fire of 1889, Parkinson came to Seattle, WA, in 01/1889; according to a ship's manifest of 1923, he was naturalized in Seattle in 03/1889. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at San Pedro/Wilmington/Los Angeles, California; NAI Number: 4486355; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Record Group Number: 85, accessed 07/11/2018.) According to a later ship's manifest, Parkinson also filed naturalization paperwork on 03/05/1930 in Washington, DC, and renewed this paperwork on 04/06/1932. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1933; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 5315; Line: 16; Page Number: 64, accessed 07/11/2018.) Voter's registration rolls of 1896 recorded that he was naturalized on 06/09/1892. It is possible that he started the process in 1889 and completed it by 1892. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation California State Library, California History Section; Great Registers, 1866-1898; Collection Number: 4 - 2A; CSL Roll Number: 21; FHL Roll Number: 976930, accessed 07/12/2018.)

Parkinson relocated to Los Angeles, CA, in 1894. He resided at 824 Westlake Avenue in 1896.

The US Census of 1900 indicated that John Parkinson lived at 532 Coronado Street in Los Angeles. At this time, the household consisted of John and Meta Parkinson, their two children, and John's mother-in-law, Dorothea Breckenfeld (born c. 08/1825 in Germany-d. 12/12/1913 in Los Angeles, CA) and sister-in-law, Bertha H. Breckenfeld (born c. 08/1864 in NY). Dora Breckenfeld had had four children, three of whom survived in 1900. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1900; Census Place: Los Angeles Ward 3, Los Angeles, California; Page: 14; Enumeration District: 0033; FHL microfilm: 1240089, accessed 07/11/2018.)

In 1901, he resided at 600 Saint Paul Avenue in Los Angeles. (See Los Angeles, California, City Directory, 1901, p. 673.)

Parkinson had relocated to San Vicente Boulevard in Santa Monica, CA, by at least 1923. He lived with his second wife, her mother and two servants at 1201 San Vicente Boulevard in Santa Monica, CA, in 1930. His mother-in-law was Jospehine Gumaer (born c. 1864 in CA), who was listed as a widow in the 1930 census. One servant was Elisa Luscher (born c. 1909 in Switzerland). She migrated to the US in about 1926. The other servant was William B. Moorhead (born c. 1865 in PA), who worked as a caretaker on the Parkinson's $60,000 property. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1930; Census Place: Santa Monica, Los Angeles, California; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 1477; FHL microfilm: 2339909, accessed 07/11/2018.)

In 1934, John and Florence Parkinson listed a home address of 808 South Spring Street in Los Angeles. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1934; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 5524; Line: 23; Page Number: 106, accessed 07/11/2018.)

He lived and worked in Southern California until his death in 1935, becoming one of the city's most successful practitioners. He died at his home, 1201 San Vicente Boulevard, Santa Monica, CA.

Parents

His father was Thomas Parkinson (1818-1888); his mother was Mary Ann Bibby Parkinson (1816-1904); both were born in Lancaster, Lancashire, England, and they married on 09/20/1856 in Garstang, Lancashire, England. (See Ancestry.com, Source Information Ancestry.com. England, Select Marriages, 1538–1973 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, accessed 07/12/2018.) Thomas was an "engine boiler stoker" in the Ormrod cotton mill in Scorton in 1861. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Class: RG 9; Piece: 3153; Folio: 143; Page: 6; GSU roll: 543088, accessed 07/12/2018.) A decade later, living in Worsley, England, his father was an engine driver in a Worsley cotton yarn mill. The British Census of 1881 indicated that both Thomas and Mary Ann had been born in Wyresdale, England.

His mother supervised the household, that included two children, Margaret, (born c. 1859 in either Garstang or Scroton, England) and John, her mother, Elizabeth Bibby, (born c. 1795 in Lancaster, England), her sister, Elizabeth Bibby, (born c. 1833 in Garstang, England), who worked as a cotton winder in a Worsley mill, Thomas's brother, Richard Parkinson, (born c. 1816 in Lancaster, England), who worked as an agricultural laborer, and a young visitor, Elizabeth A. Nuttal (born c. 1863 in Cockerham, England). (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Class: RG10; Piece: 3966; Folio: 155; Page: 4; GSU roll: 841956, accessed 07/11/2018.)

John Parkinson was named for his paternal grandfather, John Parkinson. (See Ancestry.com, Source Information Ancestry.com. England, Select Marriages, 1538–1973 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, accessed 07/12/2018.)

Spouse

Parkinson married his first wife, Meta B. Breckenfeld (born 1862 in NY-d. 03/12/1922 in Napa, CA), on 12/25/1889 in Napa, CA.

He married his second wife, Florence I. Gumaer (born 07/30/1884 in Buffalo, NY-d. 11/12/1966 in Los Angeles, CA) on 04/06/1923 in Los Angeles, CA. In 05/1923, he was 61, she, 38. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation California Department of Public Health, courtesy of www.vitalsearch-worldwide.com. Digital Images, accessed 07/11/2018.) From at least 1914 through 1917, she had a position as a stenographer with the Bank of Santa Monica. (See Santa Monica, California, City Directory, 1914, p. 138 and Santa Monica, California, City Directory, 1917, p. 139.) She was a note clerk in 1918 and by early1923, she worked as an assistant secretary at the Bank of Santa Monica, then a branch of the California Bank. (See Santa Monica, California, City Directory, 1918, p. 133 and Santa Monica, Oceanpark, Venice, Sawtelle and Westgate, California, City Directory, 1923-1924, p. 260.)

Florence Parkinson was buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, CA.

Children

With Meta C. Breckenfeld, John Parkinson had a daughter, Mary Dorothea Parkinson Trent (born 10/17/1980 in Seattle, WA-d. 05/08/1980 in Los Angeles, CA) and a son, Donald Berthold Parkinson (1895-1945), who joined his father in the family architecture business, the firm being called "Parkinson and Parkinson" between 1920-1945.

Mary Parkinson married Goodwin MurrayTrent, Sr., (1886-1946) in 03/1917. In 1940, Goodwin worked as a real estate salesman, and Mary as a drama teacher in an adult education high school. They had seven children together, including John Parkinson Trent (1918–2003), Mary Delorme Trent (1919–1995), Meta Catherine Trent (1923–1997), Christine Trent (1924–1927), Lamartine Cavanaugh "Marty" Trent (1927–1999), Goodwin (Buzzy) Murray Trent (1929–2006) and an unnamed child who died at birth in 1933. They and their five surviving childen resided at 900 San Vicente Boulevard in Santa Monica nearby to her father's old house at 1201 San Vicente, according to the US Census of 1940. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1940; Census Place: Santa Monica, Los Angeles, California; Roll: m-t0627-00257; Page: 61A; Enumeration District: 19-778, accessed 07/11/2018.)

Biographical Notes

A "Personals" note in the Los Angeles Times, 05/09/1894, (p. 10), stated: "John Parkinson, an architect of Seattle, who designed many of the largest buildings in that city, has come to Los Angeles with a view of locating."

Parkinson purchased a residential plot in the Wilshire Boulevard Tract offered by The Wilshire Company in 03/1897; he paid $1,725 for the land.

According to voter registration rolls of 1896, John Parkinson, at age 34, stood 5-feet, 10-and-1/2-inches tall, and had a light complexion, gray eyes and brown hair. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation California State Library, California History Section; Great Registers, 1866-1898; Collection Number: 4 - 2A; CSL Roll Number: 21; FHL Roll Number: 976930, accessed 07/12/2018.)

Following his second marriage in 1923, he and wife began traveling more frequently. Between 05/05/1923 and 05/12/1923, he and Florence traveled from Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii, to Los Angeles, CA, on a honeymoon vacation. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at San Pedro/Wilmington/Los Angeles, California; NAI Number: 4486355; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Record Group Number: 85, accessed 07/11/2018.)

A notice in the New York Times, 07/08/1924, indicated that Mr. and Mrs. John Parkinson were listed aboard the Cunard Liner RMS Laconia, arrived from Liverpool and Queenstown on 07/07/1924. A ship's manifest can be found for this voyage, indicating that they returned to the US between 06/26/1924 and 07/07/1924. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1924; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 3509; Line: 4; Page Number: 170, accessed 07/11/2018.)

John and Donald Parkinson donated a sizeable $1,000 in 1924 to a YMCA fund drive for new facilities.

An article published in the Architect and Engineer, vol. 80-81, 1925 (unknown month), p. 115 stated that Parkinson was in Europe in early 1925, as well: "John Parkinson, in the practice of architecture, left the early part of February on a three-months' tour of Europe to continue his study of architecture of France and Italy. He will return to New York in time to attend the annual convention of the American Institute of Architects as delegate from [the] Southern California Chapter."

Apparently, the worst effects of the Depression did not affect John and Florence Parkinson, as they took extended trips to Europe in 1930, 1933, 1934 and 1935. They returned from Liverpool, England, to New York, NY, on board the White Star Lines' RMS Adriatic, between 05/31/1930 and 06/09/1930. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1930; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 4753; Line: 19; Page Number: 20, accessed 07/11/2018.)

He and Florence traveled from Los Angeles to New York, NY, aboard the Canadian Pacific Steamship Company's RMS Empress of Britain, between 03/28/1933 and 04/11/1933. According to the ship's manifest, the couple was "in transit to Europe." (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1933; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 5315; Line: 16; Page Number: 64, accessed 07/11/2018.)

Between 07/28/1934 and 08/05/1934, they sailed between Liverpool and New York, NY on the MV Georgic, a White Star Liner. Due to the Depression and a fraud scheme involving the Irish White Star's ownership, it merged with its rival Cunard on 12/30/1933. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1934; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 5524; Line: 23; Page Number: 106, accessed 07/11/2018.)

John and Florence began a long ocean liner/train journey leaving Southampton, England on 08/10/1935 bound for Vancouver, BC, Canada, at first aboard the HMS Canada operated by the East Asiatic Company, Ltd. While in England, their last address was 94 Brighton Avenue in Bolton, England, probably the home of a relative. Less than four months after this trip, John Parkinson died. (See Ancestry.com, Source Information Ancestry.com. UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012, accessed 07/11/2018.)

Parkinson was a Presbyterian and, politically, a Republican, and known as "J.P." by friends and acquaintances.

Member, California Club, Los Angeles; Member, Jonathan Club, Los Angeles; Member, University Club, Los Angeles; Member, Union League Club, San Francisco, CA; Member, Los Angeles Country Club, Los Angeles; Member, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE), Los Angeles.

British-born historian Stephen Gee produced a documentary that aired on PBS on 07/05/2018 called "Iconic Vision: John Parkinson, Architect of Los Angeles."



Associated Locations

  • Los Angeles, CA (Architect's Office)
    Los Angeles, CA

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  • Wyre District, Scorton, UK (Architect's Birth)
    Wyre District, Scorton, UK

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  • Santa Monica, CA (Architect's Death)
    Santa Monica, CA

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PCAD id: 108


NameDateCityState
1st National Bank of Olympia, Headquarters #1, Olympia, WA 1889OlympiaWA
Anthony, Earle C., Incorporated, Building #1, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1911Los AngelesCA
Ballard, Martin D., House #1, Belltown, Seattle, WA1889-1890SeattleWA
Ballard, William R., Flats, Ballard, Seattle, WA1889SeattleWA
Bank of Napa, Headquarters Building #2, Downtown, Napa, CA1888NapaCA
Banks-Huntley Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1929-1930Los AngelesCA
Bergstrom, George Edwin, House, Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA1906Los AngelesCA
Bernard, Susana Machado, House and Barn, Los Angeles, CA1901Los AngelesCA
Blackstone's Department Store #2, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1916-1917Los AngelesCA
Braly, John Hyde, Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA 1903-1904Los AngelesCA
Breeden Building, Ocean Park, Santa Monica, CA1904Santa MonicaCA
Broadway-Hollywood Store, Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA1940Hollywood, Los AngelesCA
Brownstone Hotel, Los Angeles, CA1905Los AngelesCA
Bullock's Department Store #1, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1906-1907Los AngelesCA
Bullock's Westwood Department Store #1, Westwood, Los Angeles, CA1932Los AngelesCA
Bullock's Wilshire Department Store, Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA1928-1929Los AngelesCA
Burdick Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA 1888-1889Los AngelesCA
Butler Building #2, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA1889-1890SeattleWA
Calkins, Charles C., Hotel, Mercer Island, WA1889-1890Mercer IslandWA
Chamber of Commerce Building, Old Pasadena, Pasadena, CA1905-1906PasadenaCA
Citizens Bank Building, Pasadena, CA1914PasadenaCA
Citizens' Securities Company, Citizens' National Bank Building #2, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1914-1915Los AngelesCA
City and County of Los Angeles, Civic Center, Los Angeles, CALos AngelesCA
City of Alhambra, City Hall #1, Alhambra, CA1913-1914AlhambraCA
City of Los Angeles, City Hall #3, Civic Center, Los Angeles, CA1926-1928Los AngelesCA
City of Los Angeles, Fire Department (LAFD), Engine Company #18, Station #1, Los Angeles, CA1904Los AngelesCA
City of Los Angeles, Public Library (LAPL), Branch #2, Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA 1940Los AngelesCA
City of Portland, City Hall #2 Project, Portland, OR1890PortlandOR
Cook, A.B., House, Redlands, CA1895RedlandsCA
County of Los Angeles, Distributing Station #12, Los Angeles, CA1903Los AngelesCA
County of Los Angeles, Hall of Justice Building, Los Angeles, CA1925Los AngelesCA
Courts of Washington, Whatcom County, Courthouse #2 Project, Fairhaven, WA1890BellinghamWA
Currier Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA 1895Los AngelesCA
England, J.W., House, Redlands, CA1895RedlandsCA
Epler Building, Downtown, Seattle, WA 1889-1890SeattleWA
Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, Office Building Project, Seattle, WA1890-1891
Ford Motor Company, Factory, Central Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA1912Los AngelesCA
Garland, William, House, Central Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA1899-1900Los AngelesCA
Grant Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1901-1902Los AngelesCA
Hayward Hotel, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1905Los AngelesCA
Hilton, G.H., Double House, Seattle, WA1890SeattleWA
Holmby Hall, Westwood, Los Angeles, CA1929Los AngelesCA
Hotel Alexandria Annex, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1910-1911Los AngelesCA
Hotel Alexandria, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1905-1906Los AngelesCA
Hotel Maryland #1, Pasadena, CA1903-1904PasadenaCA
Hotel Olive, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1904-1905Los AngelesCA
Hotel Rosslyn #2, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1914Los AngelesCA
Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF), Hall Project, Seattle, WA1889SeattleWA
Jesuit College and Church, Seattle, WASeattleWA
Johnson, O.T., Commercial Building #2, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1902Los AngelesCA
Johnson, O.T., Commercial Building #3, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1906Los AngelesCA
King Edward Hotel, Los Angeles, CALos AngelesCA
Laughlin, Homer Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1897Los AngelesCA
Little Sisters of the Poor, Home for the Aged, Los Angeles, CA1906Boyle Heights, Los AngelesCA
Los Angeles Athletic Club #2, Los Angeles, CA1911-1912Los Angeles, CACA
Los Angeles Convention Hall Project, Los Angeles, CA1900Los AngelesCA
Los Angeles Gas and Electric Company, Headquarters Building, Los Angeles, CALos AngelesCA
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission, Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Exposition Park, Los Angeles, CA1921-1923Los AngelesCA
Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), Manual Arts High School, Los Angeles, CA1934-1935Los AngelesCA
Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal (LAUPT), Los Angeles, CA1937-1939Los AngelesCA
Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal (LAUPT), Restaurant, Los Angeles, CA1939Los AngelesCA
Mason Opera House, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA 1902-1903Los AngelesCA
McGuire Building, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA1889SeattleWA
Miramar Hotel, Santa Monica, CA1921Santa MonicaCA
Napa Valley Unified School District, High School Project, Napa, CA1888NapaCA
Natick House, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA 1883-1884Los AngelesCA
Norton Building, Los Angeles, CA1906Los AngelesCA
Olympia Hotel, Olympia, WA1889-1890OlympiaWA
Pacific Coast Stock Exchange, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1929-1931Los AngelesCA
Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company of California, Office Building #1, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1908Los AngelesCA
Parkinson, John and Meta, House #1, Los Angeles, CA1900-1901Los AngelesCA
Parkinson, John and Meta, House #2, Los Angeles, CALos AngelesCA
Parkinson, John and Meta, House #3, Santa Monica, CA1919-1920Santa MonicaCA
Parkinson, John, House, Seattle, WA1890SeattleWA
Perris Land Company Building, Perris, CA1894PerrisCA
Pontius, Rezin and Margaret J., House, Cascade, Seattle, WA 1889SeattleWA
Portland Chamber of Commerce, Headquarters Building Project, Portland, OR1890PortlandOR
Presbyterian Church Project, Mercer Island, WA1890Mercer IslandWA
Rowan Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1911-1912Los AngelesCA
Saks Fifth Avenue Store Building, Beverly Hills, CA1936-1937Beverly HillsCA
Seattle Athletic Club #1, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA1892-1893SeattleWA
Seattle National Bank Building, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA1890-1892SeattleWA
Seattle Pacific University (SPU), Seattle Seminary Building, Seattle, WASeattleWA
Seattle Public Schools, Cascade School, Cascade, Seattle, WA 1893-1894SeattleWA
Seattle Public Schools, Day, B.F., School, Fremont, Seattle, WA1891-1892SeattleWA
Seattle Public Schools, Denny School, 5th Avenue and Battery Street, Downtown, Seattle, WA 1883-1884SeattleWA
Seattle Public Schools, Pacific School, Seattle, WASeattleWA
Seattle Seminary, Alexander Hall, Ross Station, Seattle, WA1892-1893SeattleWA
Security-1st National Bank, Branch, Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA1921Hollywood, Los AngelesCA
Security-1st National Bank, Office Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1915-1916Los AngelesCA
Security Trust and Savings Bank, Office Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1907Los AngelesCA
Southern California Edison, Electric Power Station #3, Los Angeles, CA1902Los AngelesCA
Southern California Edison Office Building #1, Downtown, Los Angeles, CALos AngelesCA
Southern Pacific Railroad Company, Passenger Depot #3, Los Angeles, CA 1914Los AngelesCA
Spreckels Brothers Warehouse, Los Angeles, CA1909Los AngelesCA
Stearns, Colonel John E., House, Los Angeles, CALos AngelesCA
Superior Court of California, Shasta County, Courthouse Project, Redding, CA1888ReddingCA
Title Guaranty and Trust Company, Main Office Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1929-1931Los AngelesCA
Title Insurance and Trust Company, Office Building #2, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1911-1912Los AngelesCA
Trustee Company of Los Angeles, Office Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1906Los AngelesCA
Union Oil Company of California (UNOCAL), Office Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1911Los AngelesCA
Union Trust and Savings Bank, Office Building #2, Downtown, Los Angeles, CALos AngelesCA
United States Government, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Branch #1, Los Angeles, CA1929-1930Los AngelesCA
University of Southern California (USC), Bovard, George Finley, Administration Building, Exposition Park, Los Angeles, CA1920-1921Los AngelesCA
University of Southern California (USC), Bridge Hall, Exposition Park, Los Angeles, CA1928Los AngelesCA
University of Southern California (USC), Law School Building #2, Exposition Park, Los Angeles, CA1926Los AngelesCA
University of Southern California (USC), Physical Education Building, Exposition Park, Los Angeles, CA1928Los AngelesCA
University of Southern California (USC), Science Building, Exposition Park, Los Angeles, CA1928Los AngelesCA
Wallingford Building, Downtown, Seattle, WA1889SeattleWA
Washington Building, Downtown, Los Angeles, CA1912Los AngelesCA
Wholesale Terminal, Building #1, East 7th Street and South Central Avenue, Wholesale District, Los Angeles, CA1915-1917Los AngelesCA
Wholesale Terminal, Building #2, East 7th Street and South Central Avenue, Wholesale District, Los Angeles, CA1917-1919Los AngelesCA
Wholesale Terminal, Building #3, East 7th Street and South Central Avenue, Wholesale District, Los Angeles, CA1919Los AngelesCA
Wilshire Medical Building, Central Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA1927-1928Los AngelesCA
World's Columbian Exposition, Washington State Pavilion Project, Chicago, IL1892ChicagoIL
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