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Male, Germany/US, born 1871-10-29, died 1933-03-16

Associated with the firms network

Schack and Huntington, Architects; Schack and Myers, Associated Architects; Schack and Young, Architects and Engineers; Schack, James H., Architect; Schack, Young and Myers, Architects and Engineers


Professional History

Résumé

Principal, James H. Schack, Architect, Seattle, WA, 1901-1907. In 1905, Schack had his office in the Downs Building. (See Classified Ads, Seattle Daily Times, 08/22/1905, p. 14.) He used Rooms 60-64 of the Downs Block in 1906. Olof Hanson would serve as an associate c. 1906.

Partner, Schack and [Daniel Riggs] Huntington, Architects, Seattle, WA, 1908-1909. Schack and Huntington had an office in Room #64 of the Downs Block in 1908. (See R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1908, p. 1639.)

Principal, James H. Schack, Architect, 1910-1920. In 1910, Schack continued to work in Room #64 of the Downs Block. He moved to Room #50 of the same building by 1912. (See R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1910, p. 1915 and R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1912, p. 1886.) Schack worked in the Lippy Building by 1913, in Room #26 in 1915-1919. (See R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1913, p. 1821, R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1915, p. 1657, and R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1920, p. 1927.)

Partner, Schack, [Arrigo M.] Young and [David John] Myers, Architects and Engineer, Seattle, WA, 08/1920-1927. A notice in the Railway and Marine News of 08/1920 said: "James H. Schack and David J. Myers, architects and A.M. Young, structural engineer, announce that they have formed a partnership for the practice of architecture and engineering under the name of Schack, Young and Myers with offices at Suite 26 Lippy Building, Seattle." (See "New Structural Engineering Firm," Railway and Marine News, vol. XVIII, no. 8, 08/1920, p. 35.) The firm occupied Room #636 of the Central Building in 1927. (See R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1927, p. 1727..)

Principal, James H. Schack, Architect, Seattle, WA, 1930. Schack's name was listed twice in the R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1930,(p. 1935) as "James H. Schack, Architect," and as part of "Schack and Young," Architect and Engineer. The name of his solo practice did not appear in R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1931,(p. 2030).

Partner, Schack and Young, Architect and Engineer, 1929-1933 (See R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1929, p. 1968 and R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle City Directory, 1933, p. 1629.) In 1931, Schack and Young maintained their office in Room #511 of the Central Building in Seattle. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1931, p. 1476.)

Professional Activities

Member, American Institute of Architects (AIA), Washington State Chapter.

Treasurer, AIA, Washington State Chapter, 1906. (See "Washington State Chapter," American Institute of Architects Quarterly Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 4, 01/1906, p. 243.)

Patron, Seattle Architectural Club, Seattle, WA, 1910.

Treasurer, Seattle Architectural Club, Exhibition Committee, 1910.

President, AIA, Washington State Chapter, 1924-1925.

Education

College

Architectural historian David A. Rash has reported that "He had received practical training in architecture from study in evening school in Chicago and from various architectural offices." (See David A. Rash, "Schack, Young & Myers," in Jeffrey Karl Ochsner, ed., Shaping Seattle Architecture, [Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1994], p. 156.)

Personal

Relocation

James Schack was born in Råhede, Denmark, in the North Frisian coastline of what is now southwestern Denmark. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Rigsarkivet; Danmark; Kontraministerialbog; Reference: 8018031531 Source Information Ancestry.com. Denmark, Church Records, 1812-1918 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2019, accessed 01/07/2022.) The area was part of Southern Schleswig, one-half of Schleswig-Holstein which was contested by both Denmark and Germany. After 1864, the kings of Austria and Prussia, Franz Joseph I and King Wilhelm I, respectively, gained control over Schleswig-Holstein. They gained control over this land from Denmark following the Second Schleswig War that occurred between February and October 1864. Two years later, Wilhelm I obtained sovereignty over Schleswig-Holstein from the Austrians. Control over portions of Schlewwig-Holstein reverted to Denmark following two plebiscites held in 1920, Northern Schleswig reverting to Danish rule, while southern sections, with more ethnic Germans, remained with the Germans.

Before 1871, Råhede was part of the Prussian empire, but Prussia became a leading state in a newly unified Germany on 01/18/1871. Schack had been born in October 1871, about ten months after the creation of the German state, meaning he had been a German citizen at birth.

Schack came to the U.S. c. 1888. In a U.S. Passport application of 10/10/1924, Schack indicated having arrived from Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1888, and that he had "...resided 36 years, uninterruptedly, in the United States, from 1888 to 1924, at Nebr. Ia. Mo. and Seattle, Washington." No mention was made in this document of any residency in Chicago, IL. It also noted that he had been naturalized in the "Court of Div. of West. Dist. of Mo., at Kansas City, Mo. on October 11, 1900."

His sister, Mikka, immigrated to the US in 1894 and may have been a reason why he lived in IA or MO during the 1890s. Mikka died in Council Bluffs, IA, at th time of the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic. (The Spanish Flu killed about 6,116 people in IA during 1918-1919.)

Just prior to his marriage to Artie Bellows in 1899, James H. Schack had been living in Kansas City, MO.A year later, Schack lived with his new bride in Kansas City at 1911 East 15th Street. His profession on the census form was "architect." Artie Schack had been born in MO, which may have been one reason why James lived in Kansas City at the time. Additionally, a William Schack (born c. 11/1844 in IN), likely a relative, lived with his wife and five children nearby at 2221 East 15th Street. William Schack worked as a carpenter, and may have collaborated on projects with James. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1900; Census Place: Kansas City Ward 9, Jackson, Missouri; Page: 10; Enumeration District: 0088; FHL microfilm: 1240863, accessed 01/07/2022.)

He resettled in Seattle, WA, by c. 1901. In 1902, James and Artie Schack lived at 1825 12th Ave., where a male child was born on 11/13/1902.

The 1910 US Census located the Schacks living at 1446 East Roy Street in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. The Schacks were apparently doing well financially, as they maintained a staff of two household servants, Anna Magnusson (born c. 1880 in Sweden) and May E. Doster (born c. 1889 in MI). (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1910; Census Place: Seattle Ward 7, King, Washington; Roll: T624_1661; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 0140; FHL microfilm: 1375674, accessed 01/07/2022.) The 1920 US Census reported that the Schacks continued to live on East Roy Street, but the number was recorded as 1416. Either they moved, the street was renumbered, or the 1910 Census was in error. The family had no servants listed in the 1920 census. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1920; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: T625_1927; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 181, accessed 01/07/2022.)

The US Census of 1930 listed the Schack address as 1416 East Roy, and estimated the value of the house to be $10,000, about double the cost of an average house in the city at the time. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1930; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0091; FHL microfilm: 2342231, accessed 01/07/2022.)

Parents

James H. Schack's father was Peter Jørgen Schack (born c. 1836 in Denmark), the son of Jens Hansen Schack (born c. 1796 in Denmark) and Kirsten Vodder (born c. 1798 in Denmark). (See Source Citation The Danish National Archives - Rigsarkivet; København, Danmark Source Information Ancestry.com. Schleswig-Holstein, Denmark, Censuses, 1769-1860 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2021, accessed 01/05/2022.)

His mother was Jensine Schmidt (born c. 1849 in Denmark-d. after 1924 in IA).

The architect had at least one sibling, a sister, Mikka Marie Schack ((born 06/05/1875 in Råhede, Denmark-d. 11/21/1918 in Council Bluffs, IA). She arrived in the US on 04/12/1894 aboard the S.S. Spree, traveling between Bremen, Germany and New York, NY, (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1894; Arrival: New York, New York, USA; Microfilm Serial: M237, 1820-1897; Line: 7 Source Information: New York, U.S., Arriving Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010, accessed 01/05/2022.) At the time of her death at age 42, Mikka worked as a milliner in Council Bluffs. (See Ancestry.com, Source Information: Iowa, U.S., Deaths and Burials, 1850-1990 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2014, accessed 01/05/2022.)

Spouse

James H. Schack married his wife Artie Bellows (born 05/17/1874 in MO-d. 08/1864 in Seattle, WA) on 05/17/1899 in Maryville, MO, the capital of Nodaway County in the northwest corner of the state. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Missouri State Archives; Jefferson City, MO, USA; Missouri Marriage Records [Microfilm], accessed 01/07/2022.) Maryville stood about 96 miles due north of Kansas City, where James and Artie lived in 1900.

Artie's parents Frank Bellows (born c. 1832 in VT) and Mary (born c. 1844 in IN) worked on a farm near Washington Township in Nodaway County, MO, in 1880. At that time, Artie was the second youngest of seven children. The family may have been prosperous, as they retained a farm laborer William Leiftian (born c. 1852 in Prussia) and a household servant, Elizabeth McCrery (born c. 1857 in IL). (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1880; Census Place: Washington, Nodaway, Missouri; Roll: 707; Page: 281B; Enumeration District: 266, accessed 01/07/2022.)

Children

James H. Schack, Sr., and Artie Bellows Schack had five children, three of whom survived to adulthood: Edwin B. Shack (born c. 1907) and twins, John Bellows Schack (born 04/20/1909 In Seattle, WA-d. 04/25/2004 in Everett, WA) and James H. Schack, Jr. (born 04/20/1909 in Seattle, WA-d. 05/31/1997 in Portland, OR).

One son born on 11/13/1902 died at birth. Esther Bellows Schack (born 08/18/1904 in Seattle, WA-d. 03/29/1905 in Seattle, WA) lived less than one year.

In 1931, Edwin worked as a salesman for the Pacific Lamp and Supply Company. Both James, Jr., and John attended the University of Wsshington.

James H. Schack, Jr., was a tall man, 6-feet, 1-inches tall, weighing 155 pounds. He had a light brown Caucasian complexion, gray eyes and brown hair according to his draft registration card of 10/16/1940. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; WWII Draft Registration Cards for Washington, 10/16/1940-03/31/1947; Record Group: Records of the Selective Service System, 147; Box: 157, accessed 01/07/2022.) James J. married Elizabeth J. Eggert on 03/13/1943 in Seattle, WA.

Schack's great-grandson, John Schack, also became an architect.

Biographical Notes

His given name at birth was "Jens Hansen Schack." This was the name that appeared on his marriage certificate of 1899. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Missouri State Archives; Jefferson City, MO, USA; Missouri Marriage Records [Microfilm], accessed 01/07/2022.) Some sources have misspelled his middle name as either "Henson" or "Hanson."

The architect had his Lutheran Church of Denmark confirmation ceremony in 1887 in Råhede's Hviding Sogn Church. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Rigsarkivet; Danmark; Kontraministerialbog; Reference: 8018031531, accessed 01/07/2022.)

Records of Schack's entry into the US differ. According to the 1900 U.S. Census, Schack had come to the U.S. in 1889 and had been naturalized by that time. (His naturalization occurred in the US DIstrict Court in Kansas City, MO, on 10/11/1900. See Ancestry.com, Source Citation The National Archives at Kansas City; Kansas City, Missouri; Naturalization Index for the Western District of Missouri, compiled 1930 - 1950, documenting the period ca. 1848 - ca. 1950; Record Group Title: Records of the District Courts of the United States; Record Group Number: RG 21, accessed 01/07/2022.) The 1920 U.S. Census erroneously recorded that Schack had come to the U.S. in 1898 and was naturalized in 1900. Given the length of residency required to obtain naturalized status, the likelihood is that Schack had come to the U.S. in 1889.

He made a trip home to Germany in late 1907, departing from Hamburg, Germany on 01/11/1908 for New York, NY, aboard the Hamburg-Amerika liner, S.S. President Lincoln. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Staatsarchiv Hamburg; Hamburg, Deutschland; Hamburger Passagierlisten; Volume: 373-7 I, VIII A 1 Band 198; Page: 34; Microfilm No.: K_1803, accessed 01/05/2022.)

A note in the Pacific Builder and Enginer of 01/1912 stated: "James Schack, Downs building, left recently for a two months' trip to Germany. He will visit his people while away and return about March 1st." (See "Trade Notes, Personal Factors," Pacific Builder and Engineer, vol. 13, no. 2, 01/13/1912, p. 28.) He returned to the US aboard the Hamburg-Amerika Liner, S.S. Amerika, that set sail from Hamburg, Germany on 02/18/1912. It arrived in New York, NY, on 02/28/1912. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1912; Arrival: New York, New York, USA; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Line: 2; Page Number: 36 Source Information: New York, U.S., Arriving Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010, accessed 01/05/2022.)

The architect sought a passport in 1924 to visit his mother and travel in the countries of Sweden, Denmark, Germany and France, from 10/231924 or 10/28/1924 for 3 months. Like most travelers of the period, he would depart the US by steamship from New York, NY. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; Roll #: 2652; Volume #: Roll 2652 - Certificates: 483350-483849, 15 Oct 1924-17 Oct 1924. accessed 01/05/2022.)



Associated Locations

PCAD id: 2357


NameDateCityState
105 Ward Street Apartments, Seattle, WA1930-1931SeattleWA
1st Methodist Episcopal Church #3, Downtown, Seattle, WA1907-1910SeattleWA
ABC Warehouse and Transfer Warehouse, Longview, WA1922-1924LongviewWA
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (AYPE), Mines Building, Seattle, WA 1908-1909SeattleWA
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (AYPE), Oriental Building, Seattle, WA1908-1909SeattleWA
Arctic Club Building #1, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA1908-1909SeattleWA
Ballard, Roy P., House, Seattle, WA1911-1912SeattleWA
Baroness Apartment Hotel, First Hill, Seattle, WA1930-1931SeattleWA
Batley, W.A., House, Seattle, WASeattleWA
Chinese Baptist Church, Seattle, WA1922-1923SeattleWA
City of Seattle, Civic Auditorium, Seattle, WA 1925-1928SeattleWA
City of Seattle, Ice Arena, Seattle Center, Seattle, WA 1927SeattleWA
College Club #2, Downtown, Seattle, WA 1920-1921SeattleWA
Colonial Building, Longview, WA1922-1924LongviewWA
Columbia River Mercantile Department Store, Longview, WA1922-1924LongviewWA
Crematorium Project, Spokane, WA1909SpokaneWA
De La Mar Apartment Building, Queen Anne, Seattle, WA1908-1909SeattleWA
Dilling Hotel Project, Seattle, WA1909SeattleWA
Eldridge Buick Dealership, University District, Seattle, WA1925-1926SeattleWA
Farrar, Bert, Auditorium / Roller Skating Rink, Downtown, Seattle, WA 1906-1907SeattleWA
Garber, B. A., House, Capitol Hill, Seattle, WA1921-1922SeattleWA
Geary, W. Logan, House, Seattle, WA1911-1912SeattleWA
Gelb Building, University District, Seattle, WA1927SeattleWA
Grand Opera House, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA1898-1900SeattleWA
Hemrich, Andrew, House, Capitol Hill, Seattle, WA1908-1909SeattleWA
Hotel Monticello, Longview, WA1922-1923LongviewWA
Hotel Savoy #2, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA 1905-1906SeattleWA
Japanese Baptist Church, Seattle, WA1922-1923SeattleWA
Long-Bell Lumber Company Garage, Longview, WA1922-1924LongviewWA
Longview Company Apartment Building, 1302 21st Avenue, Longview, WA1922-1924LongviewWA
Longview Company Apartment Building, 1328 21st Avenue, Longview, WA1922-1924LongviewWA
Longview Company Office Building, Longview, WA1922-1924LongviewWA
Longview Master Plan, Longview, WA1922-1923LongviewWA
Normandie Apartments, Seattle, WA1909-1910
Saint Helens Inn, Dormitory, Longview, WA1922-1924LongviewWA
Seattle Chamber of Commerce, Office Building #2, Downtown, Seattle, WA1924SeattleWA
Sunset Motor Car Dealership, Seattle, WA1917-1918SeattleWA
Terry Avenue Building, Seattle, WA1915SeattleWA
University Baptist Church #2, University District, Seattle, WA1922-1926SeattleWA
Veterans' Hall, Seattle, WASeattleWA
Young, M. Harwood, House, Capitol Hill, Seattle, WA1909SeattleWA
"Washington State Chapter", American Institute of Architects Quarterly Bulletin, VI: 4, 243, 1906-01. Croly, Herbert, "The Building of Seattle: A City of Great Architectural Promise", Architectural Record, 32: 1, 10, 07/1912. Swope, Carolyn T., "M Hardwood Young Residence (1909)", Classic Houses of Seattle, 146, 246, 2005. Woodbridge, Sally, Montgomery, Roger, Guide to Architecture in Washington State, 128, 1980. Woodbridge, Sally, Montgomery, Roger, "The Baroness, 1930", Guide to Architecture in Washington State, 147, 2010. Woodbridge, Sally B., Montgomery, Roger, "Seattle Chamber of Commerce Building", Guide to Architecture in Washington State An Environmental Perspective, 123, 1980. Homes and Gardens of the Pacific Coast, 1: np, 1913. "First Methodist Episcopal Church, Seattle, Wash.", Pacific Builder and Engineer, 08/17/1906. Seattle Architectural Club Yearbook 1910, np, 1910. Seattle Architectural Club Yearbook 1910, np, 1910. "New Church To Be One of Finest in the Country", Seattle Daily Times, 13, 1906-04-26. "To Build a Fine Edifice at Once", Seattle Daily Times, 21, 1906-01-07. "Cornerstone of New Church Laid", Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 9, 1908-02-24. "A Few of the Magnificent New Homes in Seattle", Seattle Times, 5, "The Normandie", Seattle Times, 17, 1910-03-15. "Lights Blaze in Garber Home Again at Garden Club Exhibit", Seattle Times, 9, 12/11/1934. "Bert Farrar's Auditorium", Seattle Times, 40, 1906-06-24. Sullivan Jennifer,, "Church demolition protested", Seattle Times, B2, 2006-05-21. Brazier, Dorothy Brant, "213 Cherry St. and theaters past", Seattle Times, D3, 09/09/1970. "Garber to construct home", Seattle Times, 24, 10/30/1921. "Buys Lots for Home", Seattle Times, 27, 08/14/1921. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 158, 1994. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 161, 1994. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 161, 1994. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 160, 1994. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 160, 1994. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 159, 1994. Anderson, Dennis, Dietz, Duane, "Olof Hanson", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 99, 1994. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 157, 1994. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 156, 1994. Rash, David A., "Schack, Young and Myers", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 158, 1994. Johnston, Norman J., "Harlan Thomas", Shaping Seattle Architecture, 130, 1994.