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Male, US, born 1871-12-24, died 1962-05-13

Associated with the firms network

City of Seattle, City Architect, Huntington, Daniel R.; Huntington and Gould, Associated Architects; Huntington and Loveless, Architects; Huntington and Torbitt, Architects; Huntington, Daniel R., Architect; Schack and Huntington, Architects


Professional History

Résumé

Draftsman, [Robert G.] Balcomb and [Eugene R.] Rice, Architect and Engineer, Denver, CO, 1889-1894. According to the Denver Public Library, Balcomb and Rice partnered between 1886 and 1897, designing houses and commercial buildings primarily in the Denver area.

Draftsman, W. Wheeler Smith, Architect, New York, NY, 1894-1900.

Partner, [William Ellsworth] Fisher and Huntington, Architects, Denver, CO, 1900-1905. Fisher (1871-1937) worked as a draftsman for Balcomb and Rice in Denver, c. 1890, and also assisted the architect Corydon Powell Karr(born 06/14/1856 in Buffalo, NY-d. 06/10/1925 in Washington, DC)in New York, NY, c. 1891-1892. In 1904, Fisher and Huntington had an office in Rooms #17-18 of the Ferguson Building at 711 17th Avenue. Fisher practiced on his own in Rooms #17 and 18 of the Ferguson Building in 1905. Huntington was not listed as an architectural practitioner in the professional directory of theBallenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1905.(SeeBallenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1904, p. 1307.)

In the 1900s, another architect, Glen W. Huntington, practiced in Denver. He had an office in Room #310 of the McPhee Building in 1903. It is possible that he was a relation of Daniel's. Glen Huntington also employed a relation, Henry W. Huntington, who worked as a draftsman for him in 1903.(SeeBallenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1903, p. 596.)

Principal, Daniel Riggs Huntington, Architect, Seattle, WA, 1905-1907. In 1905, Huntington leased Room #419 of the Colman Building in Seattle. (See L. Stradley and Company's Seattle Business Directory, 1905, p. 7.) An relocation notice appeared in The Brickbuilder, 05/1905, that read: “Daniel Riggs Huntington, formerly of the firm Fisher & Huntington, Denver, Colo., has opened an office for the practice of architecture at 419 Coleman [sic] Building, Seattle, Wash. Mr. Huntington would be glad to receive catalogues and samples of builders’ supplies.” (See “In General,” The Brickbuilder, vol 14, no. 5, 05/1905, p. 108.)

Partner, Schack and Huntington, Architects, Seattle, WA, 1908-1909. In 1906, Huntington had an office in Room #419 of the Colman Building. (See R.L. Polk's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1906, p. 618.) The next year, he leased Room #569 of the Colman Building. (See R.L. Polk's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1907, p. 1324) Between 1909-1911, Huntington designed projects on his own and in partnership with Carl F. Gould, Sr., (1873-1939), who entered his office as a draftsman/designer.

Principal, Daniel Riggs Huntington, Architect, Seattle, WA, 1909-1913; 1915-1916; 1922-1927.

Partner, Huntington and [Arthur L.] Loveless, Architects, Seattle, WA, 1913-1914.

Architect, City of Seattle, Seattle, WA, 1916-1922. The Seattle Daily Times said in a profile of Huntington of 1919: ""His position as city architect was created by the Council June 16, 1916, and before accepting it he went before the Washington State Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, of which he is now president, and asked the approval of its members. They indorsed [sic] the plan, seeing in it a recognition of their profession rather than a possible system under which they might individually might be the losers in a business way." (See Seattle Daily Times, "Seattle Gets Beauty Touches: City Architect Plans with Care," 07/13/1919, p. 15.)

Partner, Huntington and Torbitt, Architects, Seattle, WA, 1928-1931.

Professional Activities

Associate Member, American Institute of Architects (AIA), Colorado Chapter, Denver, CO, c. 1900- 1905.

Treasurer, AIA, Colorado Chapter, Denver, CO, c. 1904.

Patron, Seattle Architectural Club, Seattle, WA, 1910.

Member, Seattle Architectural Club, Exhibition Committee, 1910.

Associate Member, American Institute of Architects (AIA), Washington Chapter, Seattle, WA, c. 1905-1913. Huntington was likely an Associate Member of the AIA between c. 1905 and 1913, and was elected to full membership in the AIA on 02/14/1913. A note in the Journal of the American Institute of Architects stated: “The following candidates (having received the approval of the Board of Examiners, and been duly balloted upon in their Chapter, or state where no chapter existed, a privileged communications having been issued), were declared Members of the American Institute of Architects, by the Executive Committee at its meeting Ferbruary [sic] 14, 1913: William Gray Purcell, Minneapolis, Minn.; William L. Steele, Minneapolis, Minn.; Albert Whitner Todd, Charleston, S.C.; Daniel Riggs Huntington, Seattle, Wash.” (See “Institute Business,” Journal of the American Institute of Architects, vol. 1, no. 4, 04/1913, p. 168.)

Secretary, AIA, Washington Chapter, Seattle, WA, c. 1908.

President, American Institute of Architects, Washington State Chapter, 1918-1919 and 1925-1926.

Education

Education

The 1940 US Census indicated that Huntington finished four years of high school, but did not attend college. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1940; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: m-t0627-04379; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 40-173, accessed 01/11/2022.)

Personal

Relocation

Born in Newark, NJ, on 12/24/1871, Daniel Riggs Huntington, Sr., spent the years 1871-1876, at least, in the New York, NY, area. (See Source Information Ancestry.com. New Jersey, U.S., Births and Christenings Index, 1660-1931 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011, accessed 01/20/2022 and The Huntington Family in America, A Genealogical Memoir of the Known Descendants of Simon Huntington from 1633 to 1915, [Hartford, CT: Huntington Family Association, 1915], p. 850.)

His parents relocated to Arlington, TX, where he spent the years 1879 through 1886, approximately. In TX, his father, John Huntington, worked as a dry goods merchant. As per the 1880 US Census, the Huntingtons lived in Arlington sharing a house with a housekeeper, Barbara Williams (born c. 1848 in TN) and her daughter Susan (born c. 1871 in TX). (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1880; Census Place: Tarrant, Texas; Roll: 1328; Page: 98B; Enumeration District: 092, accessed 01/11/2021.)

Thereafter, he bounced between the New York City area and Denver twice. He moved to Denver, CO, in 1889 to work for the firm of Balcomb and Rice, (operated by civil engineer Robert G. Balcomb and architect Eugene R. Rice), He resided at 319 24th Street in Denver in 1891. (See Ballenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1891, p. 734.) He relocated to 2421 Ogden Street by 1893 and 1248 Gaylord Street by 1894. (See Ballenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1893, p. 566 and Ballenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1894, p. 525.)

He came back to New York City five years later, assisting in the office of W. Wheeler Smith, Architect. Huntington spent the years 1894 through 1900, at least, in New York City. The US Census of 06/02/1900 found Huntington and his family living in an apartment building at 8 Morningside Avenue in Manhattan. At the time, Douglas Huntington, the architect's brother, and his mother, Marie C. Huntington, resided with him, as did a boarder, a young architect, Frank Kouchlaub (born c. 03/1876 in CO). (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1900; Census Place: Manhattan, New York, New York; Page: 2; Enumeration District: 0559; FHL microfilm: 1241106, accessed 01/20/2022.) The spelling of Kouchlaub's last name was likely misspelled by the census taker, as no information can be found on the an architect by this name.

The architect went back to Denver in 1900 to form a partnership with William E. Fisher with whom he worked approximately five years. In 1901, he and his wife maintained a residence at 1125 Sherman Avenue. He shared this address with Douglas Huntington and Mary C. Huntington. He likely supported his mother and perhaps his brother, as they both relocated to Denver with him in 1900. (See Ballenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1901, p. 713.) They moved to rooms at 1539 Franklin Street by 1902. (See Ballenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1902, p. 566.) He relocated to 4201 Alzoma Avenue at the corner of Paloma and Park Hill by 1903, and remained here for part of 1905. The street names in Denver have changed significantly since this time. Alzoma Avenue was likely renamed "22nd Avenue" in 1905. (See Ballenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1903, p. 596 and Ballenger and Richards Denver City Directory, 1905, p. 623.)

In 1905, Huntington relocated to Seattle, WA. He probably arrived later in the year, as he was not listed in the R.L. Polk's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1905.He lived at 821 10th Avenue in 1907. (See R.L. Polk's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1907,p. 615.) Five years later, he resided at 1618 36th Avenue in Seattle. (See R.L. Polk's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1910, p. 809.)

The 1920 US Census recorded Huntington as residing at 2707 33rd Avenue South in Seattle. He dwelled at this address with his wife Maud, son Daniel R. Huntington, and Mary C. Huntington. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1920; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: T625_1930; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 297, accessed 04/30/2021.)

A decade later, Huntington, his wife and son resided in a dwelling at 138 East 52nd Street in Seattle. The family owned this house, which had an approximate value of $4,000, about average for the time.

The architect and his wife lived in an apartment at 1803 East John Street in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood in 1940. They paid $38 per month in rent. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1940; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: m-t0627-04379; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 40-173, accessed 01/11/2022.)

Parents

His parents were John Huntington (born 04/04/1848 near Selma, AL-d. 01/24/1886 in TX) and Mary C. Horton (born 12/10/1849 in Rondout, NY-d. 03/25/1936 in Seattle, WA). His parents were Joshua F. Horton (born 11/25/1781 in Westchester County, NY-d. 12/08/1847 in Milton, NY) and Mary F. Purdy (born 12/25/1786 in Rye, NY-d. 10/03/1864 in Rye, NY)

Mary Horton managed the household and had to cope with the deaths of two daughters who died in childhood.

They married on 02/27/1871 and had four children: Daniel, Douglas Huntington (born 12/28/1876 in New York, NY), a daughter who died in infancy (born 04/30/1879 in Arlington, TX-d. 08/15/1879), and Gladys Huntington (born 02/01/1882 in Arlington, TX-d. 02/20/1884). (See Albert Mack Sterling, The Sterling Genealogy, Vol. Two, [New York: Grafton Press, 1909], p. 845.)

Mary Horton was one of at least four children of Daniel Horton (born 10/10/1808 in Rye, NY-d. 04/02/1901 in Rye, NY), who worked as a railroad agent and shipping agent during his long life, and Cornelia Ann Cornell (born 10/05/1809 in Rye, NY-d. in NY). It is likely that the architect was named for his maternal grandfather.

Spouse

It appears the architect married Jessie Maud Lytle (born c. 1868 in Youngstown, OH-d. 08/08/1959 in Seattle, WA)) on two occasions, first on 03/20/1904 in Golden, CO, and again on 07/20/1904 in Cuyahoga County, OH, likely in front of her family. (See Ancestry.com, Source Information Ancestry.com. Colorado, County Marriage Records and State Index, 1862-2006 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016, accessed 01/11/2022 and Ancestry.com, Source Information: Ohio, U.S., County Marriage Records, 1774-1993 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016. Original data: Marriage Records. Ohio Marriages, various Ohio county courthouses, accessed 01/11/2022.)

Maud's parents were John Shannon Lytle (1820-1879) and his second wife Mary Morrison Bell (born 1834-d. 04/26/1911 in Cleveland, OH). They wed in 1862. (See Lineage Book National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution [DAR], Vol. LXXIX, 1910, [Washington, DC: Judd and Detweiler, Incorporated, 1925] p. 28.)

In 1940, Maud had a job as an assistant clerk in a Seattle church. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1940; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: m-t0627-04379; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 40-173, accessed 01/11/2022.)

Children

Maud and Daniel Huntington had a son, Daniel Riggs Huntington, Jr., (born 12/30/1906 in Seattle, WA-d. 06/21/1991 in Snohomish County, WA). Daniel worked as a mechanic in the Willams And Swanson Garage in Renton, WA, c. 1940. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; WWII Draft Registration Cards for Washington, 10/16/1940-03/31/1947; Record Group: Records of the Selective Service System, 147; Box: 83, accessed 01/20/2022.)

He married Rowena S. Farmer (born 03/21/1904 in Los Angeles, CA-d. 01/08/2000 in Snohomish County, WA) in Seattle on 09/04/1930, and had two sons, Daniel Huntington (born c. 1932 in WA) and William Huntington (born c. 1938 in WA). (See Ancestry.com Source Citation Washington State Archives; Olympia, Washington; Washington Marriage Records, 1854-2013; Reference Number: kingcoarchmcvol33_83, accesed 01/20/2022)

Biographical Notes

Huntington was an accomplished painter, often doing landscapes; he studied with the painter and muralist, Eustace Paul Ziegler (1881-1969), who had moved to Seattle in 1924; Huntington affiliated himself with the Pacific Northwest Academy of Arts and the Seattle Fine Arts Society.

SSN: 535141982.



Associated Locations

  • Newark, NJ (Architect's Birth)
    Newark, NJ

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  • Seattle, WA (Architect's Death)
    Seattle, WA

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PCAD id: 2356


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