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Male, Scotland/US, born 1851-08-06

Associated with the firms network

Brown and Fisher, Architects; Fisher and Clark, Architects; Fisher, Elmer, H., Architect; Parkinson, John, Architect


Professional History

Résumé

Architect Elmer H. Fisher lived a restless, peripatetic existence, a lifetime filled with rapid arrivals and abrupt departures, new professions, and financial and marital instability. Living in nineteenth-century America, a milieu of massive, East-to-West, urban settlement, social upheaval and enhanced mobility (both social and physical), enabled Fisher to reshape his public persona periodically, and to change professions when necessary. Biographical details for Fisher are not consistent, due, most likely, to a combination of factors. These may have included faulty record keeping, Fisher's mistaken recollections or his lies told to suit new purposes. It is also possible that Fisher suffered from mental illness, as his life was marked by periods of manic industry and countervailing fatigue. Repeatedly, he made many sudden and impulsive career changes and abruptly and cruelly abandoned at least three women with whom he lived during his life. Periodically, Fisher also seems to have fabricated various facts about himself, perhaps to enhance his stature or experience, suggesting someone who had difficulty maintaining appearances.

Despite his handicaps, Fisher also demonstrated architectural talent that impressed clients and had enough charisma to charm and ingratiate himself with people of all kinds. After the disastrous Seattle Fire of 1889, FIsher maintained an extremely productive and succcessful architectural practice, practically rebuilding the Pioneer Square business district single-handedly. Success came at a toll, and likely caused breaks that forced him to change jobs and relationships and to switch places of residence.

All of the facts of Fisher's life are not clear. He was supposedly born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 08/1844, but this is highly doubtful. It is far more likely that he was born in MA. As architectural historians Jeffrey Ochsner and Dennis A. Andersen have noted, he first immigrated to Massachusetts c. 1857, and, thereafter, lived in Minneapolis, MN, Denver, CO, and Butte, MT, before coming to Victoria, BC, in February of 1886. In British Columbia, he designed houses and commercial buildings in the the cities of Victoria, Vancouver, Nanaimo, and Goldstream. He crossed back into the United States in 1887, landing at Port Townsend, WA, where he designed several commercial buildings in the booming lumber town.

Fisher came to Seattle, WA, later in 11/1887. His practice was greatly buoyed by the Great Fire of 06/06/1889, that destroyed 25 blocks of Seattle's Downtown. Following this trauma, Fisher raked in more than fifty commissions for more fire-proof buildings in Seattle and other locations in the state. In 1891, Fisher faced financial problems, and turned over his practice to a partner. He then took over as manager of the Abbott Hotel, Seattle, a building of his design. In 1893, a former mistress, Mary Smith, took Fisher to court, seeking to recover $10,000 in a civil breach of promise suit. She contended that Fisher and her had lived as husband and wife in Denver and Victoria, and that Fisher promised to marry her and bring her to his new home in Seattle. Apparently, Fisher broke this promise, but was acquitted of any financial liability by a jury. The ensuing scandal wrecked his reputation, and he was forced to move to that rogue's paradise, Los Angeles, CA, c. 1894.

For a short time, at least, he appears to have been welcomed there, and became Vice-President of the Southern California Chapter of the AIA in 1895. Thereafter, he apparently could not get work as an architect, and was forced to make a living as a carpenter and construction supervisor. Few records about his life in Los Angeles exist to explain what happened to him there. It may be no coincidence that prominent Seattle architect, John Parkinson (1861-1935), moved south to Los Angeles at about the same time. Parkinson had been a founding member of the AIA chapter in Washington. According to Woodbridge and Montgomery, (Woodbridge and Montgomery, Guide to Architecture in Washington State, [Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1980], p. 113), Fisher went to work for Parkinson after they both moved to Los Angeles. The moves by Fisher and Parkinson were probably also accelerated by the economic depression that occurred following a period of railroad bankruptcies and bank failures during 1893; at this time, the mighty Northern Pacific Railway, Union Pacific Railroad and Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad all reorganized. During the period 1893-1898, the national U.S. unemployment rate averaged in double-digits.

Mechanic, Athol, MA, c. 1873.

Cabinet Maker, Minneapolis, MN, 1873, (See Minneapolis City Directory, 1873, p. 162.)

Sash Maker, R.P. Russell and Company, Minneapolis, MN, 1875. Roswell P. Russell, Sr., operated a company at 100 6th Avenue South in Minneapolis, that advertised itself as "sash, doors, blinds and mouldings, planing mill, scroll sawing and box mnfrs." (See Minneapolis City Directory, 1875, p. 389.)

Band Sawyer, Denver, CO, c. 1880.

Building Contractor, Denver, CO, c. 1883-1885.

Principal, Elmer H. Fisher, Architect, Victoria, BC, 02/1886-1887. While in Victoria, BC, Fisher first styled himself an "architect."

Principal, Elmer H. Fisher, Architect, Port Townsend, WA, c. 1887-1888.

Partner, Fisher and [George] Clark, Architects, Seattle, WA, 11/1887-1888. Fisher and Clark maintained an office at 116 James Street in 1888. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1888, p. 79.) On 05/13/1888, FIsher and Clark had an office in the Butler Building #1.(See Fisher and Clark advertisement, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 05/13/1888, p. 7.)

Principal, Elmer H. Fisher, Architect, Seattle, WA, 12/1888-1891. According to the 1890 Seattle City Directory, Fisher occupied Office #8 in the Haller Block. The following year, he continued leasing the same office in the Haller Building, but lived in the Abbott Hotel, a building of his own design. The 1892 Seattle City Directory indicated that he was an architect and superintendent of the Abbott, on the southeast corner of Pike Street and 3rd Avenue. This building was also referred to as "The Fisher Building" in the same source. Fisher produced an incredible number of buildings in his three years of practice in Seattle, a track record of productivity that likely helped him find work when he left the city for Southern CA during the lean economic times of the mid-1890s.

Fisher moved to Los Angeles, CA, in 1894, and worked as an architect and carpenter there. His fortunes started robustly, but tailed off rapidly as he became more unstable and erratic.

Partner, [Carroll H.] Brown and Fisher, Architects, Los Angeles, CA, c. 10/1894-03/1895. Advertisements in the Los Angeles Times for the firm of Brown and Fisher can be found from 10/16/1894-03/07/1895. The two men also attended the same architect's meeting in 05/1895 in Los Angeles. An advertisement for the Brown and Fisher office said: "And you need a house. Before ordering plans for same talk with C.H. Brown and E.H. Fisher, No. 516 Stimson building. They can save you money. Eight-room Colonial houses flr $1800." (See "Rain Is Coming," Los Angeles Times, 12/29/1894, p. 9.) Fisher's ability to partner with Brown, an established and successful Los Angeles architect, shortly after arriving in Southern CA suggests that he had a strong architectural reputation when he transferred from Seattle.

Miner, Sunrise Mining District, AK, 05/1897-c. 1903. Most new miners that came to AK during the Klondike Gold Rush arrived in the territory in the months of April through July, with most coming in May.

Office Superintendent, John Parkinson, Architect, Los Angeles, CA, 1903. At this time, he lived at 125 East 32nd Street. (See Los Angeles City Directory, 1903, p. 443.) Fisher found work later in his life with his former Seattle colleague John Parkinson (1861-1935). He and Parkinson left Seattle for Los Angeles at about the same time just after the onset of the Depression of 1893.

Professional Activities

By 1892-1893 in Seattle, Fisher became the subject of several court cases, including a scandalous one involving a woman who alleged that the architect had reneged on marrying her. The Seattle Post-Intelligencerpublished a notice on 09/11/1892:"Calvin Nutting, jr. vs. Elmer H. Fisher--Motion for bill of particulars waived; motion for commission to take deposition; granted." (See "Civil Department-- Osborn, J.," Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 09/11/1892, p. 5.) The same paper reported on 10/23/1892: "Thomas Taylor Company vs. Elmer H. Fisher--Judgement for $1,662.36 and costs; signed." (See "Superior Court--Humes, J.," Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 10/23/1892, p. 5.)

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer of 03/29/1893 noted a court verdict against Elmer H. Fisher in 1893: "The Hall Safe and Lock Company recovered a verdict of $86 against Architect Elmer H. Fisher in Judge Osborn's court yesterday." (See "Courthouse and County Notes," Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 03/29/1893, p. 5.)

Fisher was elected Vice-President of the Southern California Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) in 1895.

Archives

Plans of Fisher's Pioneer Building are held in the University of Washington (UW) Libraries, Department of Special Collections.

Personal

Relocation

Most architectural histories have noted that Elmer H. Fisher was born in 1844 or 1845 and related that he (and his parents) may have been born in Scotland. A credible birth record for "Elmer Fisher," however, listed his birth date as 08/06/1851, and his birthplace as Royalston, MA, a town about 78 miles northwest of Boston, just south of the New Hampshire border. (See Ancestry.com, Source Information Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, U.S., Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011, accessed 11/13/2021.) His marriage records of 1873 also indicated that he was 22 years old at the time of his wedding (setting his birthdate as 1851) and born in Royalston, MA. The only firm evidence from documents currently known supports his birth in the Massachusetts.

Royalston was located on the Millers River, a 52-mile-long waterway that enabled the powering of manufacturing plants producing woolens, shoes, tools and wood products, including furniture. Millers River also ran through the nearby industrial towns of Athol and Winchendon also powering 19th century mills that produced shingles, wood products, metal goods and cloth.

The Massachusetts State Census of 1855 listed Elmer as "Horace E. Fisher" but noted that the Fishers lived in Royalston at the time. The household consisted of Horace E. Elmer, his older brother Edwin A. Fisher, and his parents, Horace and Lucy Fisher. Horace operated a farm at the time. Next door, another family with the surname "Fisher" lived, that included Watson Fisher (born c. 1825 in MA), a laborer, his wife Violetta Fisher (born c. 1834 in NH) and a lodger, Mary H. Bourn (born c. 1836 in NH) This document, though it got Elmer's name wrong, indicated that he had been born in MA, as had his brother. (See Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, U.S., State Census, 1855 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014. Original data:Massachusetts. 1855–1865 Massachusetts State Census [microform]. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts, accessed 12/16/2021.) His birthdate would have been c. 1851 according to this census.

Shortly after his first marriage to Mahala "Hala" Corey (or Covey) in 1873, Fisher relocated with her to Minneapolis, MN, by about 1873. Fisher lived in Minneapolis for about seven years before moving west to Denver, CO.

According to the U.S. Census of 1880, Fisher lived at 404 Larimer Street, Denver, CO, and was married, although he was not living with a woman at this time. His neighbors on either side of him at this address were all in the building trades, most were about his age, and may have worked together or assisted one another in some way. They included Stephen H. Lashert (age 41, a carpenter), Charles A. Bohny, (age 24, a wood turner), Joseph L. Middlebrooke (age 44, a builder), and Charles Dolmer (age 36, a builder). The 1880 census indicated that Fisher worked as a band sawyer and that he had been born in MA, while both of his parents were Scottish.

The 1880 US Census also recorded that an "Elena" Fisher, likely Hala, aged 32 and born in Canada, had two children back in Minneapolis, Lizzie A. Fisher and Leon F. Fisher. She dwelled at 1314 8th Street and worked as a housekeeper to make ends meet. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1880; Census Place: Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota; Roll: 622; Page: 442C; Enumeration District: 252, accessed 10/22/2021.)

Between 1880-1886, Ochsner and Anderson have stated that Fisher lived in the cities of Denver, Butte, MT and Minneapolis, MN, "...and worked in businesses associated with hardware, farm implements, construction and mining." They indicated that Fisher moved to Victoria, BC, by 02/1886 and by 1887 was working the town of Port Townsend, WA. (See "Jeffrey Karl Ochsner and Dennis A. Andersen, "Elmer H. Fisher," in Jeffrey Karl Ochsner, ed., Shaping Seattle Architecture, [Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1994], p. 22.)

Fisher had relocated to Seattle by 1888, when he was listed in the Seattle City Directory, as being a partner in the firm of Fisher and Clark. Fisher's address in 1888 was listed as being at Front Street (later 1st Avenue) and Union Street, a boarding house. (See Seattle CIty Directory, 1888, p. 79.) The Washington State Census of 07/1889, indicated that Fisher lived in the 2nd Ward of Seattle, WA, and worked as an architect. His age was said to be 48 in 1889, giving him a birth date of 1841. According to the U.S. Census of 1900, Fisher was 56 years old and born in 08/1844. He indicated to the census taker that he had emigrated to the U.S. from Scotland in 1845. Fisher worked in Seattle, WA, from 1887-1891 as an architect, and served as the proprietor of the Abbott Hotel (c. 1892-1893), thereafter, until moving to Los Angeles, CA, in 1894. The economic depression that set in over the US in 1893 was likely a precipitating factor in his departure from Seattle.

A record dated 05/03/1896, mentioned an "Elmer Fisher" who served as a witness to a will made at 40 Mile River Station, AK, by a miner named Charles Hill who left a fortune of $142,000. (A "Charles H. Hill," a building contractor, lived in Seattle in 1890.) A month after apparently witnessing Hill's will in AK, Fisher registered to vote in Los Angeles on 06/13/1896. (It is unclear whether the AK miner witnessing the will was the architect.) He listed his 1896 Los Angeles residence as 1362 South Flower Street. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation California State Library; Sacramento, California; Great Registers, 1866-1898; Collection Number: 4-2A; CSL Roll Number: 21; FHL Roll Number: 976930, accessed 11/13/2021.) The successful Los Angeles architect Abram Edelman (1863-1941) and his family lived on the same block across the street at 1343-1345 South Flower. He spent three years 1894-1897) in Los Angeles, and then, opportunistically, moved to Cook Inlet and Resurrection Bay, Southern Alaska Territory, in 1897. (Miners had scoured the Canadian Yukon and Alaskan Territory for gold since the mid-19th century. Smaller strikes caused mini-rushes on the Kenai Peninsula's Cooper Creek [1884] and on Resurrection Creek [1888]. Strikes in the Klondike triggered a large Gold Rush to northwestern Canada, after 08/16/1896. Some of these miners returned to AK by 1898.)

The US Census of 1900 (taken on 03/09/1900) indicated that Fisher lived in the "Sunrise Mining District," and came to the Alaskan Territory in 08/1897. As noted in this census, he retained a permanent address in Los Angeles. His CA occupation was architect, but he mined in AK. The form indicated that he immigrated to the US in 1845, making him a very young child when he arrived. (See "1900 United States Federal Census Record for Elmer H Fisher," Ancestry.com, accessed 11/21/2011.)

He lived in Los Angeles again by 1903. His time and place of death are currently undetermined.

Parents

The nationality of Fisher's parents are somewhat unclear. When asked by US Census representatives in 1900 and CA voting officials about his parent's heritage, Elmer indicated that his parents were Scottish. The CA Voter's Record of 1896 noted that Fisher had been born in Scotland of "American parents." This was likely not true. Currently, no documentation has been found that indicated Elmer Fisher emigrated from Scotland. Neither transit records nor naturalization papers have been located to prove his foreign birth.

If Elmer Fisher had been born in MA in c. 1851, as seems likely, his parents were probably Horace Fisher (born 1820 in -d. 1893) and his wife Lucy Jane Kendall (1823-1898), who lived in Royalston, MA, during the 1850s-1880s. Horace was a farmer, while Lucy managed the household that included four children: Edwin A. Fisher (born 1847 in MA), Elmer, Cora J. Fisher (born c. 1856 in MA), and Edward E. Fisher (born c. 1858 in MA).

Edwin worked as seventeen-year-old farmer with his father according the the Massachusetts State Census of 1865. He wed Ellen K. Brackenridge (1852-1913) in 1875.

Spouse

It appears that Fisher had many involvements with women, few, if any, of which were honorable.

An "Elmer H. Fisher" living in Worcester County, MA, very likely the architect, married in 1873. His bride was Mahala A. Corey or Covey (born c. 1847 in Canada), although her first name was spelled in records variously as "Hala," "Hain" and "Kata." According to court documents filed in 1883, she also went by the name "Hala A. Fisher." According to a Massachusetts marriage register, they wed on 07/07/1873 in Keene, NH. (An intention to marry was registered in Athol, MA, where they both lived, on 06/30/1873.) This marriage record noted Fisher's place of birth to have been Royalston, MA, in Worcester County and that the groom had been born in 1851. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation New England Historic Genealogical Society; Boston, Massachusetts; Massachusetts Vital Records, 1911–1915, accessed 06/15/2021.) The Minnesota Territorial Census of 1875 noted that E.H. Fisher was 24 (born in MA) and Hala (written "Halan") was three years older and born in Canada. (See Ancestry.com, Source Information Minnesota, U.S., Territorial and State Censuses, 1849-1905 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007, accessed 10/22/2021.)

Mahala's parents were Martin Corey and Laura Corey. The 1861 Canadian Census listed Martin and Laura and their seven children living on a farm outside of Stanbridge, Quebec. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Census Returns For 1861; Roll: C-1297, accessed 06/15/2021.) They continued to farm in Stanbridge a decade later.

An 1883 notice in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune confirmed that Fisher was married to Mahala A. Fisher. She filed legal proceedings against him in 03/1883, likely for divorce, as he had left Minneapolis and moved to Denver, abandoning Mahala. (See “State of Minnesota, County of Hennepin, —District Court. Fourth Judicial District. Mahala A. Fisher, generally called Hala A. Fisher, plaintiff, against Elmer H. Fisher, defendant,” Minneapolis Star-Tribune, 03/22/1883, p. 3.)

The Washington State Census of 07/1889 indicated that Fisher was married at that time. (Three years later, the 1892 WA State Census indicated him to have been single.)

While in Denver and Victoria, BC, Fisher seems to have lived with a woman named Mary Smith whom he promised that he would marry, but never did. She sued him in Seattle for breach of promise in 1893, creating a embarrassment for the architect that may have affected his practice.

He married again to Charlotte Mary Willey (or Mary Charlotte Willey, born c. 1869 in WA-d. 09/14/1914 in Seattle, WA) on 02/14/1893, Valentine's Day, in the house of her mother, Margaret Burns Harmon (d. 1893), in Seattle. (See Ancestry.com, "King County Marriage Records, 1855-1990 - Elmer H Fisher - Charlotte M Willey," accessed 04/21/2014 and Ancestry.com, "Washington, Marriage Records, 1865-2004 about Elmer H Fisher," accessed 04/21/2014.) The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported on the marriage: "Elmer H. Fisher, the well-known architect and proprietor of the Abbott house, was married last evening to Mrs. Charlotte M. Willey, at the residence of the bride's mother, Mrs. Harmon, Seventh and Alder streets. Judge Osborn performed the ceremony, and Mr. and Mrs. Fisher left on the evening train for Portland." (See "Marriage of Architect Fisher," Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 02/15/1893, p. 3.) In 1880, Margaret and Lottie Harmon lived in Seattle, where the former ran a hotel. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1880; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: 1396; Page: 259A; Enumeration District: 007, accessed 11/13/2021.)Prior to Fisher, Lottie Harmon married Samuel Willey, with whom she had two children. They wed on 11/19/1883 in Seattle.

When Fisher left for Los Angeles in 1894, he did not take Lottie, who remained in WA between 1894-1900. She was granted a divorce on 01/16/1900 in Los Angeles. (See Ancestry.com, "1900 United States Federal Census for Mary C Willey," accessed 04/21/2014.) The Los Angeles Herald reported in its issue of 02/17/1900: “Mary C. Fisher was granted a decree yesterday by Judge York, divorcing her from Elmer H. Fisher on the ground of failure to provide. The parties were married at Seattle in February 1893, but the plaintiff averred that her husband was given over to ‘idleness, she being without fault.’ The husband is now supposed to be at Sunrise City, Cook’s Inlet, Alaska, and service was made by publication.” (See “Courthouse Briefs: The Fisher Divorce,” Los Angeles Herald, 01/17/1900, p. 8. See also “Willful Neglect Basis of Divorce,” Los Angeles Evening Post-Record, 01/16/1900, p. 2.)

As per the 1900 US Census, her name was again "Charlotte M. Willey," and she lived with one of her children in Olympia, WA. This census indicated her to be living on her own and divorced. Her daughter, Lydia Willey, age 8, had been born in 01/1892. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1900; Census Place: Olympia, Thurston, Washington; Page: 21; Enumeration District: 0228; FHL microfilm: 1241752, accessed 11/13/2021.)

By 1910, Charlotte had moved from Olympia back to Seattle, and, like many single women of the period, she operated a rooming house. (Divorce brought shame for women of that time, and Lottie may have left Seattle for Olympia for that reason. She returned on or before 1910 when people had long forgotten her failed nuptials with Elmer H. Fisher.) (See "1910 United States Federal Census about Mary C Willey," [Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Seattle Ward 5, King, Washington; Roll: T624_1659; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 0112; FHL microfilm: 1375672.] Accessed 04/21/2014.) She later married a man named Calvert, and died with his last name. She was buried in the Harmon Family plot of Lake View Cemetery in Seattle.

Children

Elmer and Mahala Fisher likely had two children together, Lizzie A. Fisher (born c. 1875 in Minneapolis, MN) and Leon F. Fisher (born c. 1877 in Minneapolis, MN).

The Minnesota Territorial Census of 1875 indicated that E.H. and Hala Fisher resided in Minneapolis, and had a daughter, Lizzie Fisher (born c. 1875 in MN). (See Ancestry.com, Source Information Minnesota, U.S., Territorial and State Censuses, 1849-1905 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007, accessed 10/22/2021.)

The 1880 US Census indicated that Leon lived with "Elena" Mahala Fisher. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1880; Census Place: Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota; Roll: 622; Page: 442C; Enumeration District: 252, accessed 10/22/2021.)

Biographical Notes

The architect's middle name was almost certainly "Horace," like that of his father. The 1855 Massachusetts State Census listed him under the name "Horace E. Fisher." (See Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, U.S., State Census, 1855 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014. Original data:Massachusetts. 1855–1865 Massachusetts State Census [microform]. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts, accessed 12/16/2021.) It was common for people to reverse the order of their first and middle names especially if their first name was the same as that of a parent. Using the middle name would help to differentiate the parent from the child.

In 1896, at the age of 51, CA State Voter Records (1896) indicated that Fisher stood 5-feet, 10-and-1/2-inches tall and had a fair, Caucasian complexion. He had blue eyes and brown hair. He claimed on this voter's form to have been born in Scotland "of American parents," which appears to have been untrue. It is unclear why Fisher told people at this time that he had been born in Scotland, other than perhaps he was trying to embellish on his own roots. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation California State Library; Sacramento, California; Great Registers, 1866-1898; Collection Number: 4-2A; CSL Roll Number: 21; FHL Roll Number: 976930, accessed 11/13/2021.) His architectural colleague in Seattle and Los Angeles, John Parkinson, a very respected practitioner, was actually born in England, and his success as a cultivated Englishman may have spurred Fisher to want to emulate this aspect of his life. Fisher left Seattle at about the same time as Parkinson and went to the same destination as him. Fisher even worked for Parkinson when things got tight in 1903.



Associated Locations

  • Royalston, MA (Architect's Birth)
    Royalston, MA 01368


  • Victoria, BC Canada (Architect's Office)
    Victoria, BC Canada

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    Elmer H. Fisher's office c. 1886 in Victoria, BC, occupied Rooms 1, 2 and 3 in Spencer's Arcade, a building that he designed.

PCAD id: 1565


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Colman Building Project, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA1887-1888SeattleWA
Denny, William, Building, Victoria, BC, Canada 1886VictoriaBC
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Haller, George Morris, Building, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA 1889-1890SeattleWA
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Roth, Lottie, Building, Whatcom, WA1890-1891WhatcomWA
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Willes Bakery, Victoria, BC, Canada1887VictoriaBC
Yesler, Henry L., Building, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA1889-1891SeattleWA
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