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Male, US, born 1857-10-11, died 1929-08-27

Associated with the firms network

Taylor and Wenderoth, Architects; United States Government, Department of the Treasury, Office of the Supervising Architect, Taylor, James Knox


Professional History

Résumé

Draftsman, Charles C. Haight, Architect, New York, NY, c. 1879.

Draftsman, Bruce Price, Architect, New York, NY, c. 1880.

Partner, [Cass] Gilbert and Taylor, Architects, Minneapolis, MN, 1882-1893.

Partner, [Amos J.] Boyden and Taylor, Architects, Philadelphia, PA, 1893-1895.

Senior Draftsman, Office of the Supervising Architect of the Department of Treasury, Washington, D.C., 1895-1897.

Supervising Architect, Department of the Treasury, Washington, D.C., 1897-1912; an article appeared in the San Francisco Call announcing Taylor's resignation: "James Knox Taylor, supervising architect of the treasury department, today tendered his resignation to the secretary of the treasury, to take effect June 15. Taylor has been in the government service since 1895. He announced his intention of engaging in private business." (See "U.S. Architect Resigns to Take up Own Work," San Francisco Call, 1912-06-06, p. 6.)

Teaching

Professor of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, 1913-1914.

Education

High School/College

Taylor was educated at secondary schools in MN. B.S. Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, two-year course, 1877-1879.

Personal

Relocation

Born in Knoxville, IL, Taylor spent his childhood in Saint Paul, MN; he attended college in Cambridge, MA, and lived subsequently in New York, NY, Minneapolis, MN, and Philadelphia, PA, his wife's childhood home. As soon as the Taylors arrived in Philadelphia, the city faced a financial disaster. On 02/23/1893, the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad became insolvent, triggering a national chain of railroad and bank bankruptcies. Due to the bleak financial picture in the city, the architect began to search for work within and outside the city, tapping all of his professional contacts. From his student days at MIT, he knew William Martin Aiken, who worked in the Office of the Supervising Architect of the U.S. Treasury in Washington, DC. (Aiken would become the Supervising Architect between 1895-1897.) By 09/03/1893, he was applying for a draftsman's job in that office and secured full-time employment in 1895. (Technically, he seems to have continued his Philadelphia partnership with Amos Boyden until about 1897.) Taylor was elevated to become Supervising Architect himself in 10/1897, a job that he held until 1912. In 1900, he and his wife lived at 164 Vermont Avenue in Washington, DC; in 1910, they lived at 274 Connecticut Avenue, (The Highlands), Washington, DC. He became a Professor at his alma mater in 1913, teaching for one year before returning to Philadelphia. He subsequently moved to Tampa, FL, where lived until his death. (Much of the information here is derived from Sandra L. Tatman's biography published by the Philadelphia Architects and Buildings Database,Accessed 06/08/2010.)

Parents

His parents were H. Knox and Mary (Young) Taylor; his parents were both from NY. In 1860, his parents lived in Knoxville, IL; the U.S. Census of 1860 indicated that H.K. Taylor, a clerk, had real estate worth $3,500 and a personal estate of $2,500.

Spouse

He married Adele Chambers Taylor, (born c. 02/1864 in PA) who grew up in Philadelphia, PA. They married c. 1886. Her father came from PA, her mother, NJ.

Children

The U.S. Census of 1900 indicated that James K. Taylor and Adele Chambers Taylor had had one child, who was not alive in that year.



Associated Locations

  • Knoxville, IL (Architect's Birth)
    Knoxville, IL

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  • Tampa, FL (Architect's Death)
    Tampa, FL

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PCAD id: 1529


NameDateCityState
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (AYPE), United States Government Building, Seattle, WA 1908-1909SeattleWA
United States Government, Courthouse, Custom House and Post Office, Downtown, Seattle, WA 1906-1909SeattleWA
United States Government, Department of Justice, Federal Courts, Courthouse #1, SW Portland, Portland, OR1869-1875PortlandOR
United States Government, Department of the Treasury, Custom House, Portland, OR1897-1901PortlandOR
United States Government, Federal Office Building and Post Office, Bellingham, WA1912-1913BellinghamWA
United States Government, Postal Service (USPS), Main Post Office #2 and Federal Court House, Civic Center, San Francisco, CA1897-1905San FranciscoCA
United States Government, Postal Service (USPS), Post Office #1, Downtown, Salem OR1901-1903SalemOR
United States Government, Postal Service (USPS), Post Office #2, Los Angeles, CA
United States Government, Postal Service (USPS), Post Office and Courthouse, Eureka, CA1910EurekaCA
United States Government, Postal Service (USPS), Post Office and Courthouse, Yakima, WA1911-1912YakimaWA
United States Government, Postal Service (USPS), Post Office, Alameda, CA1911-1912AlamedaCA
United States Government, Postal Service (USPS), Post Office, Santa Rosa, CA1908-1910Santa RosaCA
United States Government, Postal Service (USPS), Post Office, Spokane, WA1909SpokaneWA
United States Government, US Post Office and Custom House, San Diego, CA1911-1913San DiegoCA
United States Government, United States District Court, 9th Circuit, Northern District, Courthouse #1, San Francisco, CA1897-1905San FranciscoCA