Male, born 1916-11-26, died 2014-07-17

Associated with the firms network

Dahlstrand, Olof, Architect; Langhorst and Langhorst, Architects; Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, (SOM), San Francisco, CA


Professional History

Résumé

Architect, Herbst and Kuenzli, Architects, Milwaukee, WI, 10/16/1940. In 1940, Edwin C. Kuenzli (born 01/24/1871 in Milwaukee, WI-d. 11/21/1948) and William C. Herbst ((born 1885 in Milwaukee, WI-d. 1959) had an office at 1249 North Franklin Place, Milwaukee, WI. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; Draft Registration Cards for Wisconsin, 10/16/1940-03/31/1947; Record Group: Records of the Selective Service System, 147; Box: 134, accessed 02/24/2022.) Herbst and Kuenzli practiced together from 1919 until 1942.

Associate, Langhorst and Langhorst, Architects, San Francisco, CA, 1948-c. 1952. Fred Langhorst (worked both for Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin Fellowship and in the office of William W. Wurster (1895-1973), absorbing ideas from both architects. The Langhorsts gained wide exposure during the late 1940s designing expansive, single-floor residences for affluent clients living in the Bay Area's expanding suburbs. One of the Langhorsts' most publicized residences was the Alexander Ker House in Marin County, (1946-1947). Dahlstrand arrived in the office in time to participate in the "Domestic Architecture of the San Francisco Bay Region," exhibition held at the San Francisco Museum of Art between 09/16/1949 and 10/30/1949. This was a widely-viewed and publicized exhibit that underscored the residential achievements of Bay Area architects such as Wurster, Gardner A. Dailey (1895-1967), the Langhorsts, and others during the 1930s and 1940s.

Architect, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (SOM), Architects, San Francisco, CA, c. 1955.

Principal, Olof Dahlstrand, Architect, Carmel, CA. Dahlstrand worked in Carmel on various commercial and residential projects between about 1962 and 1984. He retired in the latter year.

Professional Activities

Member, Carmel Art Association, Carmel, CA.

Member, City of Carmel Planning Commission, Carmel, CA, 1986- . In 1986, actor Clint Eastwood feuded with four members of the City of Carmel Planning Commission who rejected his application to erect a retail-office building next to his hotel, the Hog's Breath Inn in Carmel, CA. Seeking to change city politics, Eastwood ran to become Carmel's Mayor in 1986 and won. Once installed as mayor, Eastwood filled two vacancies on the commission. A little later, on 06/03/1986, he received the City Council's 4-1 backing to replace four other members of the Carmel Planning Commission with four allies, one of whom was Olof Dahlstrand. Those commissioners removed included: Eugene Cava, Marjorie Montelius, Thomas Nash and Sandy Swain. They were replaced by Olof Dahlstrand; Bill Brown, publisher of the Pine Cone newspaper; Fred Keeble, like Dahlstrand, a former architect; and Carla Ramsey, a real estate professional. (See "Clint Eastwood makes his day by firing four Carmel planners," Santa Cruz Sentinel, 06/04/1986, p. 14.)

Archives

The University of California, Berkeley (UCB), College of Environmental Design Archives, acquired Dahlstrand's drawings and documents.

Education

College

B.Arch., Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1939. While at Cornell, Dahlstrand was a member of the Delta Phi Fraternity.

Personal

Relocation

Born in Wauwatosa, WI, a suburb seven miles west of Milwaukee, Olof Dahlstrand resided with his family at 167 Maple Terrace in Wauwatosa during World War I. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Registration State: Wisconsin; Registration County: Milwaukee County Source Information Ancestry.com. U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005, accessed 02/25/2022.) His parents were Swedish immigrants who came to the US during the 1900s and early 1910s, part of a wave of Germans and Scandinavians that resettled in the Milwaukee area beginning in the 1830s. German began to focus on relocation to Milwaukee in the 1830s.

The flow of Swedish immigrants never rivalled that of the Germans, and started about a decade later, in 1840. According to the Encyclopedia of Milwaukee: "Major Swedish emigration to North America began after 1840, when a 1768 Swedish royal decree forbidding it was revoked. The change in policy combined with the death of the king to help spur movement to North America." The Encyclopedia continued: "The late nineteenth and early twentieth century phase of Swedish immigration saw different classes of Swedes enter Wisconsin. The newer Swedes were poor farmers who had left their homes due to economic and social changes. Swedish agricultural policy had begun to push modernization, which transitioned farming from open-field systems to one based on enclosure and individual ownership. Further compounding the financial difficulties were demographic and military pressures, as Sweden experienced a significant population boom in the nineteenth century, which made land even scarcer, and the Swedish crown stiffened laws requiring impressment of males. The Swedish immigrants who arrived in Milwaukee and Wisconsin therefore tended to be less well off than the early Swedish settlers. They tended to be male, in search of work in rural areas, and willing to integrate into the developing societies in their new regions." (See Bill Reck, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.edu, "Encyclopedia of Milwaukee: Swedes," accessed 02/25/2022.)

While many Swedish immigrants of the early 1900s may have been less affluent, agricultural workers, Hans Peter Dahlstrand, Olof's father, was a mechanical engineer who engaged in factory work. He was employed by the Allis-Chalmers Company by 1917, producers of a wide-range of mechanisms from generators, milling equipment and farm implements. H.P. Dahlstrand worked on power generation equipment and likely made good money from his work.

The Dahlstrands continued to reside at 167 Maple Terrace when the 1920 US Census was made, in a neighborhood composed largely of Wisconsin-natives and recent German immigrants. They could afford a housekeeper in 1920, Anna Johnson (born c. 1888 in Sweden), who had migrated from Sweden in 1916. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Registration State: Wisconsin; Registration County: Milwaukee County Source Information: U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005, accessed 02/25/2022.)

They lived at 7027 Maple Terrace in 1930, perhaps the same house as they inhabited in 1920, the address of which was renumbered during the 1920s. As noted by the 1930 census, the family owned its own residence, worth about $10,000 and could afford to pay a servant, Mary Krueger (born c. 1896 in WI). The value of the Dahlstrand's residence was about double that of an average house at the time. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1930; Census Place: Wauwatosa, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0374; FHL microfilm: 2342333, accessed 02/24/2022.)

Dahlstrand matriculated at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, during the mid-1930s.

In 1938, the architect married Jean Thwaits in Dubuque, IA.

After attending Cornell, Dahlstrand returned to WI to practice, c. 1940-1948. In 10/1940, he and his wife lived at 4575 West Bluemound Road in Milwaukee. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; Draft Registration Cards for Wisconsin, 10/16/1940-03/31/1947; Record Group: Records of the Selective Service System, 147; Box: 134, accessed 02/24/2022.)

In 1944, he and his wife lived at 4619 West Blue Mound Road in the neighborhood near Mitchell Boulevard Park in West Milwaukee. At this time, during World War II, Dahlstrand's profession was listed in the city directory as an "engineer." (See Milwaukee, Wisconsin, City Directory, 1944, p. 260.)

He moved to the Bay Area in 1948, to work for the husband-and-wife architectural firm of Fred and Lois Langhorst. It is possible that he resided in or near Lafayette, CA, in 1956. His son, Peter, graduated from Acalanes High School at that time. (See "Acalanes Graduates 241 June 17," Contra Costa Times, 06/07/1956, p. 15.)

He relocated to Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA, by at least 1959. He worked on the design of the Carmel Plaza Building at that time. (See "Notes on Bay Commerce," Oakland Tribune, 05/13/1959, p. 58.) Later, he resided on Santa Lucia Avenue. (See Ancestry.com, Source Information Ancestry.com. U.S., Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 2 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010, accessed 02/22/2022.)

Parents

His father Hans Petter Dahlstrand (born 09/24/1874 in Leabo, Bosebo, Jönköpings Landskap, Sweden-d. 04/24/1968 in Rhinelander, WI) was nearly fourteen years older than his mother, Karin Linnea Andersson (born 07/17/1888 in Brevik, Skaraborg Lanskap, Sweden-d. 1964 in Santa Barbara, CA). Her parents were Aron Andersson and Agnes Viktoria Sandblom.

Karin left Sweden on 11/13/1913 from Jönköpings Förs Jönk Landskap, Sweden to marry Hans Petter on 12/20/1913 in Milwaukee, WI. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Archives of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; Elk Grove Village, IL, USA; Swedish American Baptisms, Marriages, Deaths, and Burials; Parish: Augustana Lutheran Church; ELCA Film Number: A238-240; SSIRC Film Number: A238, accessed 02/24/2022.)

Raised in an agricultural town in the Jönköping Landskap (province) of Sweden, Hans Petter left his native country in 1903 and arrived in NY, NY by 05/02/1904. ((See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Archives of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; Elk Grove Village, IL, USA; Swedish American Baptisms, Marriages, Deaths, and Burials; Parish: Augustana Lutheran Church; ELCA Film Number: A238-240; SSIRC Film Number: A238, accessed 03/03/2022.) In Wisconsin, he became a mechanical engineer, working with the Allis-Chalmers Company in Milwaukee during World War I. He specialized in power-generation machinery according to the 1930 US Census. He migrated to the US in 06/1903 from an agricultural community in Sweden, according the US Censuses of 1920 and 1930. He was naturalized an American citizen in 1914. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1930; Census Place: Wauwatosa, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0374; FHL microfilm: 2342333, accessed 02/24/2022.) In 1920, Hans Petter applied for a US passport in order to travel to England representing the Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Company abroad. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; Roll #: 1269; Volume #: Roll 1269 - Certificates: 57376-57749, 23 Jun 1920-23 Jun 1920, accessed 02/25/2022.) He also made a trip to England and Sweden in 1922, this time with his family. (See below.)

His parents belonged to the Augustana Lutheran Church in Wauwatosa, where Olof was baptized. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Archives of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; Elk Grove Village, IL, USA; Swedish American Baptisms, Marriages, Deaths, and Burials; Parish: Augustana Lutheran Church; ELCA Film Number: A238-240; SSIRC Film Number: A238, accessed 02/22/2022.)

Olof had a brother, Nils Peter Dahlstrand (born 12/30/1919 in Wauwatosa, WI-d 01/11/2009 in Waushara County, WI), who also attended one year at Cornell University and then transferred to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he studied in the well-known https://soils.wisc.edu/people/history/.

Spouse

Dahlstrand married Jean Eunice Thwaits.(born 09/24/1917 in WI-d. 10/10/1995 in Carmel, CA) on 04/06/1938 in Dubuque, IA. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Iowa Department of Public Health; Des Moines, Iowa; Series Title: Iowa Marriage Records, 1923–1937; Record Type: Marriage, accessed 02/22/2022.) Her father was Frederick George Thwaits (born 09/26/1892 in Beloit, WI-d. 1969), an engineer and her mother, Ida Marie Martha Rückert (born 06/07/1891 in Berlin, Germany-d. 06/10/1969 in Milwaukee, WI), who immigrated to the US from Germany in 1892 and had been naturalized, according to the 1920 US Census. At this time, the Thwaits rented an apartment at 535 Cass Street in Milwaukee, WI. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Year: 1920; Census Place: Milwaukee Ward 3, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Roll: T625_1998; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 44, accessed 02/22/2022.)

She attended Wauwatosa High School, like Olof Dahlstrand.

Later in life, he wed Lucia Dahlstrand. He was married to her by 2003. They acted as executors of the estate of Charles W. Thwaits, likely a relative of his wife's, at that time. (See "Notice to Creditors," Santa Fe New Mexican, 03/14/2003, p. 23.)

Children

He had two sons, Peter O. Dahlstrand (born 09/21/1938 in Ithaca, NY) and Alan Thwaits Dahlstrand (born 12/26/1941 in WI).

Peter graduated from Acalanes High School in Lafayette, CA, in 1956, would live in Berkeley, CA, during the 1980s and 1990s. (See "Acalanes Graduates 241 June 17," Contra Costa Times, 06/07/1956, p. 15.)

Alan wed Marie Elena Daly on 07/27/1968 in Silver Bow, MT. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services; Helena, Montana; Montana State Marriage Records, 1943-1986, accessed 02/22/2022.)

Biographical Notes

A WI State birth record for Dahlstrand listed his name as "Otto Olof Hans Dahlstrand." (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Wisconsin Department of Health Services; Madison, Wisconsin; Wisconsin Birth Records, accessed 06/20/2022.)

In 1922, five-year-old Olof traveled back to Sweden with his parent and brother. This was a business trip for Hans Petter for Allis-Chalmers, and, according to the US passport form, the family intended set sail from New York, NY on 05/27/1922, aboard the S.S. Stockholm. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; Roll #: 1943; Volume #: Roll 1943 - Certificates: 159976-160349, 02 May 1922-03 May 1922, accessed 03/03/2022.) They journeyed on this trip to England and Sweden, returning aboard the Swedish-American Liner S.S. Drottningholm from Göteborg, Sweden on 08/03/1922, bound for New York. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Landsarkivet I Göteborg, Sverige; Göteborg, Sweden; Göteborgs Poliskammare E Ix, 1-143, accessed 03/03/2022.)

On 10/16/1940, Dahlstrand stood 5-feet, 8-inches tall and weighed 135 pounds. Caucasian, he had a light complexion, blue eyes and blonde hair. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; Draft Registration Cards for Wisconsin, 10/16/1940-03/31/1947; Record Group: Records of the Selective Service System, 147; Box: 134, accessed 02/24/2022.)

Dahlstrand worked as an artist in his later years. Watercolors and drawings by Dahlstrand were included in a show of three local artists at the Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art, Monterey, CA, in 1982. (See "Art," The [Salinas] Californian, 07/03/1982, p. 22.) In 1996, Dahlstrand had a one-man show of his paintings at the Marjorie Evans Gallery in Carmel, CA, beginning on 02/01/1996. (See "Arts," The [Salinas] Californian, 02/01/1996, p. 24.) He had a showing, along with Heidi Hybl and other artists, at the Carmel Art Association beginning on 02/07/2009 in Carmel. (See "Calendar," The [Salinas] Californian, 02/05/2009, p. 15.)


PCAD id: 9035