Male, died 1957-05-26

Associated with the firms network

Bebb and Gould, Architects; Rogers, Frederick J., Architect


Professional History

Résumé

Draftsman, Bebb and Gould, Architects, Seattle, WA, 1924. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1924, p. 1211.)

Draftsman, O.W. Harris, Seattle, WA, 1925. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1925, p. 1200.)

Principal, Frederick J. Rogers, Architect, Seattle, WA. In 1926, Rogers had an office in Room #566 of the Central Building. He moved to Room #912 of the Arctic Building in 1927. It is probable that Rogers was not yet a registered architect in the State of Washington in 1926 or 1927. In 1930, he listed himself as an "architectural designer," suggesting he was not yet certified.

Principal, Frederick J. Rogers, Architectural Designer, Seattle, WA, 1930. Rogers worked as an architectural designer from his his apartment, (#101) at 2933 2nd Avenue in Seattle in 1930. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1930, p. 1455.)

The Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1931, (p. 2030) listed Rogers under its directory of contractors; it listed Rogers as an "architectural contractor." In the midst of the Depression (1933-1934), he worked in Room #317 of the Lloyd Building, and then occupied space in the Textile Tower in Rooms #1504 (1935-1936), and #1106 (1937).

Architect, Harry G. Hammond, Seattle, WA, 1938-1942.

Principal, Frederick J. Rogers, Architect, Seattle, WA, 1945-1956. During this time, he worked at 3501 West McGraw Street (1945-46) and 166 Roy Street (1947-1956).

Personal

Relocation

While a draftsman with Bebb and Gould in 1924, Rogers had a residence at 1303 9th Avenue in Seattle, WA. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1924, p. 1211.)

In 1925, Rogers and his wife lived at 232 32nd Avenue in Seattle, WA. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1925, p. 1200.) They maintained their home in the "Penbrook Hotel" in 1926, at 4th Avenue and Marion Street.(See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1926, pp. 1260 and 1598.)

Rogers worked as an architectural designer from his apartment, (#101), at 2933 2nd Avenue in Seattle in 1930. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1930, p. 1455.)

In 1953, Fred and Edwina Rogers lived and worked at 166 Roy Street in Seattle. (See Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1953, p. 1178.)

Parents

His father was Frederick S. Rogers, his mother, Elizabeth Nevins.

Spouse

He wed Alice Rogers in the mid-1920s.

King County Justice of the Peace Guy B. Knott married Rogers and Edwina Hertrich on 02/24/1944 in Seattle, WA. (See Ancestry.com, Source Citation Washington State Archives; Olympia, Washington; Reference Number: kingcoarchmcvol125_820, accessed 09/19/2018.)


PCAD id: 7878