Structure Type: built works - dwellings -public accommodations - hotels

Designers: Allen, Frank Phillip, Jr., Architect (firm); Hebbard, William Sterling, Architect (firm); Frank Phillip Allen Jr. (architect); William Sterling Hebbard (architect)

Dates: constructed 1913-1914

6 stories

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F Street and 6th Avenue
East Village, San Diego, CA 92101


Overview

San Diego's Maryland Hotel was in operation c. 1917 on F Street between 6th and 7th Avenues. At this time, William A. Kamps was the manager.

Building History

In 1913, at least 3 firms submitted plans to Joseph Sefton for the design of his Sefton Hotel. The three included the eventual winner, William S. Hebbard, along with Hebbard's former partner, Irving J. Gill (1870-1936) and the Pasadena-based architect Frank S. Allen (1859-1930), who also had a practice in San Diego. The building occupied the former site of the city's main post office and several other wood-frame buildings. (See Kathleen Flanigan,"William Sterling Hebbard Consummate San Diego Architect," Journal of San Diego History, vol. 33, no. 1, Winter 1987, see footnote #57.) It was known as the Sefton for only a short time, before being renamed the Maryland; by 1916, it was already known as the Maryland Hotel.

Building Notes

Architectural historian Kathleen Flanigan discussed the Maryland Hotel in her article "William Sterling Hebbard Consummate San Diego Architect" (1987). She wrote: "Constructed in 1913, the only remaining hotel of Hebbard's design in San Diego, the Maryland Hotel, on F, Sixth and Seventh Streets, emphasized a six-storied structure called "one of the most modernly equipped in San Diego." It was the only hotel in San Diego to have connecting baths with all 295 rooms, telephones and clothes closets. Its exterior construction of steel and brick was finished with Tracy Tapestry brick set in wide recessed joints with trimming of ornamental stone. Each floor contained a number of individual balconies. The building, heated with steam throughout, was cleaned by a built-in vacuum system." (See Kathleen Flanigan,"William Sterling Hebbard Consummate San Diego Architect," Journal of San Diego History, vol. 33, no. 1, Winter 1987.)

PCAD id: 19837